Etymology
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denial (n.)

1520s, "refusal to grant what is requested or desired;" see deny + -al (2). Replaced earlier denyance (late 15c.). Sense of "act of asserting to the contrary, contradicting" is from 1570s; that of "refusal to accept or acknowledge" is from 1580s. In some 19c. uses, it really means "self-denial." Meaning "unconscious suppression of painful or embarrassing feelings" first attested 1914 in A.A. Brill's translation of Freud's "Psychopathology of Everyday Life"; hence the phrase in denial, popularized 1980s.

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disclaimer (n.)

"denial of a claim," mid-15c., from Anglo-French disclaimer "disavowal, denial," infinitive used as a noun in French (see disclaim). Compare waiver.

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unh-unh 
sound expressing negation or denial, attested from 1951.
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ascetic (n.)
1650s, "one rigorous in self-denial," especially as an act of religious devotion; 1670s, Ascetic, "one of the early Christians who retired to the desert to live solitary lives of meditation, self-denial, and prayer," from ascetic (adj.).
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apophasis (n.)

in rhetoric, "a denial of an intention to speak of something which nonetheless is hinted at," 1650s, from Late Latin apophasis, from Greek apophasis "denial, negation," from apophanai "to speak off," from apo "off, away from" (see apo-) + phanai "to speak," related to phēmē "voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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abnegation (n.)
Origin and meaning of abnegation

late 14c., "a negative assertion," c. 1500 as "self-denial, renunciation," from Latin abnegationem (nominative abnegatio) "refusal, denial," noun of action from past-participle stem of abnegare "to refuse, deny," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + negare "to deny," from PIE root *ne- "not."

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negation (n.)

early 15c., negacioun, "an act of denial," from Old French negacion (12c.) and directly from Latin negationem (nominative negatio) "denial," noun of action from past-participle stem of negare "deny, say no," from PIE root *ne- "not." As "a negative assertion," mid-15c.

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rebuff (n.)

"a repelling; a check, a defeat; peremptory denial or refusal," 1610s, from rebuff (v.), or from French rebuffe or Italian ribuffo.

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disavowal (n.)

"denial, rejection, repudiation, action of refusing to acknowledge," 1748; see disavow + -al (2). An earlier word was disavowment (1630s).

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