Etymology
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albedo (n.)

in astronomy "proportion of light reflected from a surface," 1859, from scientific use of Latin albedo "whiteness," from albus "white" (see alb).

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aubade (n.)

"song to be performed in open air in the early morning, musical announcement of dawn," 1670s, from French aubade "dawn" (15c.), from Provençal aubada, from auba "dawn," from Latin alba, fem. of albus "white" (see alb).

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albescent (adj.)

"becoming white," 1825, from Latin albescentem (nominative albescens), present participle of albescere "become white," inceptive of albere "be white" (from Latin albus "white;" see alb), with inchoative suffix -escere. Related: Albescence.

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albumen (n.)

1590s, "white of an egg," from Latin albumen (ovi) "white (of an egg)," literally "whiteness," from the neuter of albus "white" (see alb). The organic substance (which exists nearly pure in egg whites) so called from 1800, also known as albumin (1869, from French albumine).

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alp (n.)

"high, snow-capped mountain," especially in Switzerland, 1590s, from Alps, from French Alpes, from Latin Alpes "the Alps," which is perhaps from altus "high," or albus "white" or from a Celtic word (according to Maurus Servius Honoratus the grammarian), or a borrowing from a non-Indo-European language. Alps, the central European mountain range, is attested by that name in English from late 14c.

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Albigensian (adj.)

c. 1600, "relating to the Albigenses," collective name for the Catharist religious reformers of southern France c. 1020-1250, from Medieval Latin Albigenses (12c.), from French Albi, name of the town in Languedoc where they lived and first were condemned as heretics (1176) and vigorously persecuted (the Albigensian Crusade). The town name is from Roman personal name Albius, from Latin albus "white" (see alb). Also sometimes Albanesian.

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auburn (adj.)

early 15c., "whitish, yellowish-white, flaxen-colored," from Old French auborne, from Medieval Latin alburnus "off-white, whitish," from Latin albus "white" (see alb). The meaning shifted 16c. to "reddish-brown" under influence of Middle English brun "brown" (see brown (adj.)) which also changed the spelling. Since the sense-shift it has generally been limited to hair. As a noun by 1852.

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alb (n.)

late Old English albe "white linen robe" worn by priests, converts, etc., from Late Latin alba (in tunica alba or vestis alba "white vestment"), fem. of albus "white," from PIE root *albho- "white" (source also of Greek alphos "white leprosy," alphiton "barley meal;" Old High German albiz, Old English elfet "swan," literally "the white bird;" Old Church Slavonic and Russian lebedi, Polish łabędź "swan;" Hittite alpash "cloud").

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daub (v.)

late 14c., dauben, "to smear with soft, adhesive matter, to plaster or whitewash a wall" (Dauber as a surname is recorded from mid-13c.), from Old French dauber "to whitewash, plaster" (13c.), perhaps from Latin dealbare, from de-, here probably meaning "thoroughly," + albare "to whiten," from albus "white" (see alb).

From 1590s as "to dress or adorn (a person) without style or taste." Painting sense is from 1620s. Related: Daubed; daubing, daubery. As a noun from mid-15c. as "daubing material, cheap kind of mortar;" 1761 as "inartistic painting."

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albino (n.)

"a person of pale, milky complexion, with light hair and pink eyes," also used of an animal characterized by the same condition or a plant with white leaves or flowers, 1777, from Spanish or Portuguese albino, from Latin albus "white" (see alb). Used by Portuguese of white-spotted African negroes. Extended 1859 to animals having the same peculiarity. As an adjective form albinotic is modeled on hypnotic and other words from Greek; albinistic also is used. A female form, if one is still wanted, was albiness (1808).

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