Etymology
Advertisement
broken-hearted (adj.)

also brokenhearted, "depressed or crushed by grief of despair," 1520s, from broken + -hearted. Related: Broken-heartedly; broken-heartedness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
smashed (adj.)

1819, "crushed," past-participle adjective from smash (v.). Slang meaning "drunk" is from 1962.

Related entries & more 
couscous (n.)

c. 1600, North African dish originally made from crushed durum wheat, from French couscous (16c.), ultimately from Arabic kuskus, from kaskasa "to pound, he pounded."

Related entries & more 
tisane (n.)

medicinal tea, 1931, from French tisane; earlier ptisan (14c.), from Latin ptisana, from Greek ptisane "crushed barley," related to ptissein "to winnow, crush, peel" (see pestle).

Related entries & more 
groats (n.)

"hulled grain coarsely ground or crushed; oatmeal," early 14c., from grot "piece, fragment," from Old English grot "particle," from same root as grit (n.). The word also meant "excrement in pellets" (mid-15c.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pesto (n.)

green, aromatic, olive oil-based pasta sauce, a Genoese specialty, 1937, from Italian pesto, contracted form of pestato, past participle of pestare "to pound, to crush," in reference to the crushed herbs and garlic in it, from Latin root of pestle.

Related entries & more 
pomace (n.)

mid-15c., pomis, "pulp of apples or similar fruits crushed by grinding, cider," from Medieval Latin pomacium or Old French pomaz, plural of pome "cider; apple," from Latin pomum "fruit; apple" (see Pomona).

Related entries & more 
tarmac (n.)

1903, Tarmac, a trademark name, short for tarmacadam (1882) "pavement created by spraying tar over crushed stone," from tar (n.1) + John L. McAdam (see macadam). By 1919, tarmac was being used generally in Great Britain for "runway."

Related entries & more 
tan (n.)

"bronze color imparted to skin by exposure to sun," 1749, see tan (v.). Earlier as "substance made of crushed bark used in making leather" (c. 1600). As a simple name for a brownish color, in any context, it is recorded from 1888. The adjective meaning "of the color of tanned leather" is recorded from 1660s. Tan-line attested from 1979.

Related entries & more 
tannin (n.)

"tannic acid, vegetable substance capable of converting animal hide to leather," 1802, from French tannin (1798), from tan "crushed oak bark containing tannin" (see tan (v.)). Tannic acid first recorded 1836, from French acide tannique, inroduced 1834 by French chemist Théophile-Jules Pelouze (1807-1867).

Related entries & more