Etymology
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cream (n.)

early 14c., creyme, "the rich and buttery part of milk," from Old French cresme, craime, creme "chrism, holy oil" (13c., Modern French crème). This word is a blend of Late Latin chrisma "ointment" (from Greek khrisma "unguent;" from PIE root *ghrei- "to rub") and Late Latin cramum "cream," which is of uncertain origin, perhaps from Gaulish. The French word replaced Old English ream; it was re-borrowed 19c. as creme.

From early 15c. as "dish or confection made from or resembling cream." The figurative sense of "most excellent element or part" is from 1580s. It is attested from 1660s as "any part that separates from the rest and rises to the surface" and also in its application to substances resembling cream. Cream-cheese is from 1580s. Cream-soda is attested by from 1854. Cream-colored (also cream-coloured) "having the pale, yellowish-white color of cream," is from 1707.

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cream (v.)

mid-15c., "to foam, to froth," from cream (n.). From 1610s in figurative sense of "remove the best part of." Meaning "to beat, thrash, wreck" is 1929, U.S. slang; the exact sense connection is unclear. There was a slang cream (v.) in the 1920s that meant "cheat, deceive, especially by guile." Related: Creamed; creaming.

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ice-cream (n.)

1744, earlier iced cream (1680s), "a confection made by congealing variously flavored cream or custard in a vessel surrounded with a freezing-mixture," from ice (n.) + cream (n.). For ice-cream cone (1909), see cone.

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creamer (n.)

1858, "dish for skimming cream from milk," agent noun from cream (v.). As "a pitcher or small jug for cream at the table," by 1877.

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creme de la creme (n.)
"elite, finest flower of society," 1848, from French crème de la crème, literally "the cream of the cream" (see cream (n.)).
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creamery (n.)

1808, "establishment where milk is made into butter and cheese," from French crémerie, from crème (see cream (n.)).

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creamy (adj.)

mid-15c., "like cream in consistence or appearance;" late 15c., "containing cream;" from cream (n.) + -y (2). Related: Creamily; creaminess.

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creme (n.)

French crème (see cream (n.)), used in various names of syrupy liqueurs in English from 1821, in phrases in English cookery books from 1845. For crème brûlée, see brulee.

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creampuff (n.)

also cream-puff, by 1859 as a kind of light confection, from cream (n.) + puff (n.). In figurative sense of "ineffectual person, weakling, sissy," it is recorded by 1935.

I remember my first campaign. My opponent called me a cream puff. That's what he said. Well, I rushed out and got the baker's union to endorse me. [Sen. Claiborne Pell, D-R.I., 1987]

As a salesman's word, "something that is a tremendous bargain," it is from 1940s.

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*ghrei- 

ghrēi-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to rub." 

It forms all or part of: chrism; Christ; christen; Christian; Christmas; cream; grime; grisly; Kriss Kringle.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek khriein "to anoint, besmear;" Lithuanian grieju, grieti "to skim the cream off;" Old English grima "mask, helmet, ghost," Middle Low German greme "dirt."

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