Etymology
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shooting (n.)
Old English scotung, verbal noun from shoot (v.). Sports sense from 1885; film camera sense by 1920. Shooting gallery is from 1836; shooting match is from 1750. Shooting star first recorded 1590s (shoot (v.) with reference to meteors is from late 13c.).
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crap (n.)

1898, "excrement;" see crap (v.). Sense of "rubbish, nonsense" also is attested by 1898.

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crap (v.)

"to defecate," 1846, from a cluster of older nouns, now dialectal or obsolete, applied to things cast off or discarded (such as "weeds growing among corn" (early 15c.), "residue from renderings" (late 15c.), underworld slang for "money" (18c.), and in Shropshire, "dregs of beer or ale"), all probably from Middle English crappe "grain that was trodden underfoot in a barn, chaff" (mid-15c.), from French crape "siftings," from Old French crappe, from Medieval Latin crappa, crapinum "chaff." Related: Crapped; crapping.

For connection of the idea of defecation with that of shedding or casting off from the body, compare shit (v.). Despite the etymological legend, the word is not from the name of Thomas Crapper (1837-1910) who was, however, a busy plumber and may have had some minor role in the development of modern toilets. The name Crapper is a northern form of Cropper (attested from 1221), an occupational surname, obviously, but the exact reference is unclear. Crap (v.) as a variant of crop (v.) was noted early 19c, as a peculiarity of speech in Scotland and what was then the U.S. Southwest (Arkansas, etc.).

Draw out yere sword, thou vile South'ron!
   Red wat wi' blude o' my kin!
That sword it crapped the bonniest flower
   E'er lifted its head to the sun!
[Allan Cunningham (1784-1842), "The Young Maxwell"]
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crappy (adj.)

"worthless, inferior, disgusting," 1846, from crap (n.) + -y (2). Related: Crappily; crappiness.

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crapper (n.)

"a toilet, an outhouse," 1932, agent noun from crap (v.).

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shoot (n.2)
1530s, "an act of shooting;" 1852 as "a shooting match or party," from shoot (v.).
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gunning (n.)
1560s, "science of firing guns;" 1620s, "shooting," verbal noun from gun (v.).
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triathlon (n.)
1970, from tri- "three" + Greek athlon "contest;" formed on model of decathlon, biathlon, etc. Originally of various combinations of events; one of the earliest so called combined clay-pigeon shooting, fly-fishing, and horse-jumping; another was cross-country skiing, target shooting, and a giant slalom run; and a third connected to the U.S. Army involved shooting, swimming, and running. Applied to the combination of a long swim, a bicycle-race, and a marathon by 1981.
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marksmanship (n.)

"character or skill of a marksman; dexterity in shooting at the mark," 1823, from marksman + -ship.

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fowl (v.)
Old English fuglian "to catch birds," from the source of fowl (n.). Related: Fowled; fowling. Fowling-piece "gun used for shooting wildfowl" is from 1590s.
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