Etymology
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tract (n.2)
"little book, treatise" mid-12c., probably a shortened form of Latin tractatus "a handling, treatise, treatment," from tractare "to handle" (see treat (v.)). Related: Tractarian.
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tract (n.1)
"area," mid-15c., "period or lapse of time," from Latin tractus "track, course, space, duration," lit, "a drawing out or pulling," from stem of trahere "to pull, draw," from PIE root *tragh- "to draw, drag, move" (source also of Slovenian trag "trace, track," Middle Irish tragud "ebb;" perhaps with a variant form *dhragh-; see drag (v.)). The meaning "stretch of land or water" is first recorded 1550s. Specific U.S. sense of "plot of land for development" is recorded from 1912; tract housing attested from 1953.
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acreage (n.)
"number of acres in a tract of land," 1795, from acre + -age.
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moorland (n.)

"tract of waste land," Old English morlond; see moor (n.) + land (n.).

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flats (n.)
"level tidal tract," 1540s, from flat (n.) in the Middle English "level piece of ground" sense.
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trait (n.)

late 15c., "shot, missiles;" later "a stroke in drawing, a short line" (1580s), from French trait "line, stroke, feature, tract," from Latin tractus "drawing, drawing out, dragging, pulling," later "line drawn, feature," from past participle stem of trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)). Sense of "particular feature, distinguishing quality" in English is first recorded 1752.

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parenteral (adj.)

"involving the introduction of a substance into the body other than by the alimentary tract," 1905, from para- (1) + Greek enteron "intestine" (see enteric).

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pine-barren (n.)

"level, sandy tract covered sparsely with pine trees," 1731, American-English, from pine (n.) + barren (n.).

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Crohn's disease (n.)

" chronic inflammatory condition of the digestive tract," 1935, for U.S. pathologist Burrill Bernard Crohn, one of the team that wrote the article describing it in 1932.

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trattoria (n.)
"Italian restaurant," 1832, from Italian trattoria, from trattore "host, keeper of an eating house," from trattare "to treat," from Latin tractare, frequentative of trahere (past participle tractus) "to draw" (see tract (n.1)).
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