Etymology
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correspond (v.)

1520s, "to be in agreement, to be in harmony with," from French correspondre (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin correspondere"correspond, harmonize, reciprocate," from assimilated form of com "together, with (each other)" (see com-) + respondere "to answer" (see respond).

Originally in Medieval Latin of two things in mutual action, but by later Medieval Latin it could be used of one thing only. In English, sense of "to be similar" (to) is from 1640s; that of "to hold communication with" is from c. 1600; specifically "to communicate by means of letters" from 1640s (in mid-18c. it also could mean "have sex"). Related: Corresponded; corresponding.

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corresponding (adj.)

1570s, "related by correspondence," present-participle adjective from correspond. Not common until 19c., when it took on the adjectival function of correspondent. Related: Correspondingly (1836).

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transgender (adj.)

also trans-gender, by 1974 in reference to persons whose sense of personal identity does not correspond with their anatomical sex, from trans- + gender (n.). Related: Transgendered.

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congruous (adj.)

"accordantly joined or related, fit, consistent," c. 1600, from Latin congru-, stem of congruere "agree, correspond with" (see congruent) + -ous. Shakespeare has congrue (v.), from the Latin verb. Related: Congruously; congruousness.

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caboose (n.)
1747, "ship's cookhouse," from Middle Dutch kambuis "ship's galley," from Low German kabhuse "wooden cabin on ship's deck;" probably a compound whose elements correspond to English cabin and house (n.). Railroading sense "car for the use of the conductor, brakeman, etc.," is by 1859.
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tally (v.)
mid-15c., "keep an account by tally," from Medieval Latin talliare "to tax," from tallia (see tally (n.)). Meaning "correspond, agree" is from 1705; sports sense of "to score" is from 1867. Related: Tallied; tallying. Hence tally-sheet (1889); tallyman "one who keeps account (of anything)" (1857).
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correspondent (adj.)

early 15c., "having an analogous relationship (to), answering, matching," a sense taken up since 19c. by corresponding; from Medieval Latin correspondentem, present participle of correspondere "correspond, harmonize, reciprocate," from assimilated form of com "together, with (each other)" (see com-) + respondere "to answer" (see respond).

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congruity (n.)

"agreement between things, harmony," late 14c., from Old French congruité "relevance, appropriateness" or directly from Late Latin congruitatem (nominative congruens) "agreement," from congruus "suitable, agreeing," from congruere "to agree, correspond with," literally "to come together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + a lost verb *gruere, *ruere "fall, rush" (see congruent).

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correspondence (n.)

early 15c., "congruence, resemblance, harmony, agreement," from Medieval Latin correspondentia, from correspondentem (nominative correspondens), present participle of correspondere "correspond, harmonize, reciprocate," from assimilated form of com "together, with (each other)" (see com-) + respondere "to answer" (see respond). Sense of "communication by letters" is first attested 1640s; that of "the letters which pass between correspondents" is from 1771.

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respond (v.)

"make answer, give a reply in words," c. 1300, respounden, from Anglo-French respundre, Old French respondere "respond, correspond" and directly from Latin respondere "respond, answer to, promise in return," from re- "back" (see re-) + spondere "to pledge" (see sponsor (n.)). Modern spelling and pronunciation is from c. 1600. From 17c. also "make a liturgical response." Related: Responded; responding.

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