Etymology
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cookery (n.)

"art or practice of cooking and dressing food for the table," late 14c.; see cook (n.) + -ery.

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gastronome (n.)
"a judge of the arts of cookery," 1823, from French gastronome, a back-formation from gastronomie (see gastronomy). Alternative gastronomer is recorded from 1820.
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cacciatore (adj.)
in cookery, "hunter-style," by 1973, from Italian, literally "hunter," from past participle of cacciare "to hunt, chase" (see chase (v.)).
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flambe (adj.)

1869, of certain types of porcelain, 1914 as a term in cookery, from French flambé, past participle of flamber "to singe, blaze" (16c.), from Old French flambe "a flame" (from Latin flamma "flame, blazing fire," from PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn"). Middle English had flame (v.) in cookery sense "baste (a roast) with hot grease, to baste; to glaze (pastry)."

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kugel (n.)
kind of pudding in Jewish cookery, 1846, from Yiddish kugel, literally "ball," from Middle High German kugel "ball, globe" (see cog (n.)).
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flavoring (n.)
"thing that gives flavor," 1845, originally in cookery, verbal noun from flavor (v.). Middle English flauryng meant "perfume."
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cookbook (n.)

also cook-book, "book containing recipes for cooking," 1809, from cook (n.) + book (n.). Earlier was cookery book (1630s).

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steamer (n.)
1814 in the cookery sense, agent noun from steam (v.). From 1825 as "a vessel propelled by steam," hence steamer trunk (1885), one that carries the essentials for a voyage.
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creme (n.)

French crème (see cream (n.)), used in various names of syrupy liqueurs in English from 1821, in phrases in English cookery books from 1845. For crème brûlée, see brulee.

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coconut (n.)

1610s, "fruit of the tropical palm tree," from coco + nut. In reference to the dried, shredded flesh of the nut used in cookery and confections, by 1830. Meaning "the head" is slang from 1834. Coconut-oil is attested from 1829.

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