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convey (v.)

early 14c., conveien, "to go along with;" late 14c., "to carry, transport;" from Anglo-French conveier, Old French convoiier "to accompany, escort" (Modern French convoyer), from Vulgar Latin *conviare "to accompany on the way," from assimilated form of Latin com "with, together" (see con-) + via "way, road" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle").

Meaning "communicate by transmission" is from late 14c. Sense of "act of transferring property from one person to another" is from 1520s. It was a euphemism for "steal" 15c.-17c., which helped broaden its meaning. Related: Conveyed; conveying.

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conveyor (n.)

1640s, "one who conveys," agent-noun in Latin form from convey. The form conveyer is earlier (1510s). Sense of "mechanical contrivance for carrying objects" is from 1813. Conveyor-belt is attested from 1868.

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conveyance (n.)

mid-15c., conveiaunce, "act of conveying, act of carrying or transporting," from convey + -ance. Meaning "document by which something is legally conveyed" is from 1570s; sense "means of transportation" is attested from 1590s. Related: Conveyancer; conveyancing (n.). The Old French abstract noun was convoiement.

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convoy (n.)

1550s, "the act of guiding or escorting for protection," from obsolete verb convoy "to accompany on the way for protection" (late 14c.), from Old French convoiier, from Vulgar Latin *conviare, literally "go together on the road," from assimilated form of Latin com "with, together" (see con-) + via "way, road" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle").

Compare convey. The meaning "an escort, an accompanying and protecting force" is from 1590s; sense transferred by c. 1600 to "train of ships or wagons carrying munitions or provisions in wartime under protection of escort."

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*wegh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to go, move, transport in a vehicle."

The root wegh-, "to convey, especially by wheeled vehicle," is found in virtually every branch of Indo-European, including now Anatolian. The root, as well as other widely represented roots such as aks- and nobh-, attests to the presence of the wheel — and vehicles using it — at the time Proto-Indo-European was spoken. [Watkins, p. 96]

It forms all or part of: always; away; convection; convey; convex; convoy; deviate; devious; envoy; evection; earwig; foy; graywacke; impervious; invective; inveigh; invoice; Norway; obviate; obvious; ochlocracy; ogee; pervious; previous; provection; quadrivium; thalweg; trivia; trivial; trivium; vector; vehemence; vehement; vehicle; vex; via; viaduct; viatic; viaticum; vogue; voyage; wacke; wag; waggish; wagon; wain; wall-eyed; wave (n.); way; wee; weigh; weight; wey; wiggle.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit vahati "carries, conveys," vahitram, vahanam "vessel, ship;" Avestan vazaiti "he leads, draws;" Greek okhos "carriage, chariot;" Latin vehere "to carry, convey," vehiculum "carriage, chariot;" Old Church Slavonic vesti "to carry, convey," vozŭ "carriage, chariot;" Russian povozka "small sled;" Lithuanian vežu, vežti "to carry, convey," važis "a small sled;" Old Irish fecht "campaign, journey," fen "carriage, cart;" Welsh gwain "carriage, cart;" Old English wegan "to carry;" Old Norse vegr, Old High German weg "way;" Middle Dutch wagen "wagon."

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proport (v.)

"convey to the mind, express," late 14c., from Old French proporter (12c.), variant of porporter "convey, contain, carry" (see purport (v.)). Apparently archaic or obsolete after 17c.

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transport (v.)

late 14c., "convey from one place to another," from Old French transporter "carry or convey across; overwhelm (emotionally)" (14c.) or directly from Latin transportare "carry over, take across, convey, remove," from trans "beyond, across" (see trans-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Sense of "carry away with strong feelings" is first recorded c. 1500. Meaning "to carry away into banishment" is recorded from 1660s.

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complimentary (adj.)

1620s, "intended to express or convey a compliment," from compliment (n.) + -ary. In later use loosely meaning "free of charge."

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channel (v.)

1590s, "to wear or cut channels in," from channel (n.). Meaning "convey in a channel" is from 1640s. Related: Channeled; channeling.

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chauffeur (v.)

"convey by car, drive as a chauffeur," 1902, from chauffeur (n.). Related: Chauffeured; chauffeuring.

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