Etymology
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consult (v.)

"ask advice of, seek the opinion of as a guide to one's own judgment," 1520s, from French consulter (16c.), from Latin consultare "consult, take the advice of," frequentative of consulere "to take counsel, meet and consider," originally probably "to call together," as in consulere senatum "to gather the senate" (to ask for advice), from Proto-Italic *kom-sel-e-, from *kom- "with, together" (see con-) + *sel-e- "take, gather together," from PIE root *s(e)lh- "to take" (said to be also the source of Middle Welsh dyrllid "to earn," Gothic saljan "to sacrifice," Old Norse selja "to sell, hand over"). Related: Consulted; consulting.

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consultative (adj.)

"pertaining to consultation, advisory," 1580s, from Medieval Latin *consultativus, from consultat-, past-participle stem of consultare "consult, take the advice of" (see consult).

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consultant (n.)

1690s, "person who consults an oracle," from consult + -ant. In medicine, "physician called in by the attending physician to give consultation in a case," by 1872 (perhaps from French, where it was in use by 1867); general meaning "one qualified to give professional advice" is first attested 1893 in a Sherlock Holmes story. Related: Consultancy (1955).

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confer (v.)
Origin and meaning of confer

1530s, "examine by comparison;" 1540s (intransitive) "consult together on some special subject;" 1560s, "bestow as a gift or permanent possession," from Old French conférer (14c.) "to give; to converse; to compare," from Latin conferre "to bring together," figuratively "to compare; consult, deliberate, talk over," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + ferre "to bear, carry," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children."

The sense of "taking counsel" led to conference. The oldest English meaning, that of "compare" (common 1530-c. 1650), is largely obsolete, but the abbreviation cf. still is used in this sense. Related: Conferred; conferring.

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jurisconsult (n.)
"one who gives his opinion in cases of law," c. 1600, from Latin iurisconsultus, originally two words, genitive of ius "law" (see jurist) + present participle of consultare "consult, take the advice of" (see consultation).
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consultation (n.)

early 15c., "a meeting of persons to consult together;" 1540s, "act of consulting," from Latin consultationem (nominative consultatio) "a mature deliberation, consideration," noun of action from past-participle stem of consultare "to consult, ask counsel of; reflect, consider maturely," frequentative of consulere "to deliberate, consider," originally probably "to call together," as in consulere senatum "to gather the senate" (to ask for advice), from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) +  *selere "take, gather," for a total sense of "gather (the Senate) together," from PIE *selho- "to take, seize."

De Vaan writes: "Since consuleredoes not look like a derivative of consul (we would rather expect consulare), it appears that the verb was original and meant 'to get together, deliberate'."

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deliberative (adj.)

1550s, "pertaining to deliberation," from French délibératif or directly from Latin deliberativus "pertaining to deliberation," from past-participle stem of deliberare "consider carefully, consult," literally "weigh well," from de, here probably "entirely" (see de-) + -liberare, altered (probably by influence of liberare "to free, liberate") from librare "to balance, make level," from libra "pair of scales, a balance" (see Libra). Meaning "characterized by deliberation" is by 1650s. Related: Deliberatively; deliberativeness.

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deliberate (adj.)

early 15c., "done with careful consideration," from Latin deliberatus "resolved upon, determined," past participle of deliberare "consider carefully, consult," literally "weigh well," from de, here probably "entirely" (see de-) + -liberare, altered (probably by influence of liberare "to free, liberate") from librare "to balance, make level," from libra "pair of scales, a balance" (see Libra). Meaning "characterized by slowness in decision, consciously unhurried" is attested by 1590s. Related: Deliberateness.

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technophobe (n.)

by 1952, perhaps by 1946, from techno- + -phobe.

If the reader will consult such a book as Recent Economic Changes, by David A. Wells, published in 1889, he will find passages that, except for the dates and absolute amounts involved, might have been written by our technophobes (if I may coin a needed word) of today. [Henry Hazlitt, "Economics in One Lesson," 1952 edition]
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deliberation (n.)

late 14c., deliberacioun, "act of weighing and examining," from Old French deliberation, from Latin deliberationem (nominative deliberatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of deliberare "consider carefully, consult," literally "weigh well," from de, here probably "entirely" (see de-) + -liberare, altered (probably by influence of liberare "to free, liberate") from librare "to balance, make level," from libra "pair of scales, a balance" (see Libra).

Sense of "slowness in decision or action" is from early 15c. Meaning "mutual discussion and examination of the reasons for and against a measure" is from late 15c..

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