Etymology
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connective (adj.)

"having the power of connecting, serving to connect," 1650s, from connect + -ive (if from Latin, it likely would have been *connexive). Connective tissue is from 1839.

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connectivity (n.)

"state or degree of connectedness," 1872, from connective + -ity.

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-ocracy 

word-forming element; -cracy with a connective -o-.

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-ial 

adjectival word-forming element, variant of -al (1) with connective -i-. From Latin -ialis, in which the -i- originally was from the stem of the word being attached but later came to be felt as connective.

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angelolatry (n.)

"worship of angels," 1847, from angel + -latry "worship of," with connective -o-.

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-ian 

variant of suffix -an (q.v.), with connective -i-. From Latin -ianus, in which the -i- originally was from the stem of the word being attached but later came to be felt as connective. In Middle English frequently it was -ien, via French.

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-ify 

variant of verbal suffix -fy with connective -i-. Related: -ific; -ification.

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moneyocracy (n.)

1834, from money + -cracy "rule or government by." With connective -o-.

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Christology (n.)

"branch of theology which studies the person and character of Jesus," 1670s, from Christ + connective -o- + -logy.

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synaptic (adj.)

1895, used as an adjective corresponding to synapsis, from Greek synaptikos, literally "connective, copulative."

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