Etymology
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confine (v.)

1520s, "to border on, have a common boundary," a sense now obsolete, from French confiner "to border; to shut up, enclose," which is perhaps from the noun confins (see confines) or from Medieval Latin confinare "border on; set bounds." Sense of "restrict within bounds, keep within limits" is from 1590s. Related: Confined; confining.

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unconfined (adj.)

c. 1600, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of confine (v.).

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confinement (n.)

1620s, "state of being confined; any restraint by force, necessity, or obstacle," from French confinement (16c.; the Old French word was confinacion), from confiner "to border; to shut up, enclose" (see confine).

As "restraint from going abroad by childbirth," perhaps a euphemism for childbed it dates from 1774 (the Middle English expression was Our Lady's bands). To be confined "be unable to leave the house or bed from sickness or childbirth" is attested from 1772.

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cage (v.)

"to confine in a cage, to shut up or confine," 1570s, from cage (n.). Related: Caged; caging.

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intern (v.1)

1866, "to confine within set limits," from French interner "send to the interior, confine," from interne "inner, internal" (14c.), from Latin internus "within, internal" (see internal; also compare intern (n.)).

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circumscribe (v.)

late 14c., "to encompass; confine, restrain, mark out bounds or limits for," from Latin circumscribere "to make a circle around, encircle, draw a line around; limit, restrain, confine, set the boundaries of," from circum "around, round about" (see circum-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Related: Circumscribed; circumscribing.

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jail (v.)

"to put in jail, to confine as if in jail," c. 1600, from jail (n.). Related: Jailed; jailing.

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coop (v.)

"put into a coop, confine in a narrow compass" (usually with up), 1560s, from coop (n.). Related: Cooped; cooping.

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cramp (v.2)

"to bend or twist," early 14c., from cramp (n.2) and Old French crampir "to bend, twist." Later "compress forcibly" (1550s), and, figuratively, "to restrict too straitly, confine or hinder the free action" (1620s). Meaning "to fasten, secure, or confine with a cramp" is from 1650s. To cramp (one's) style is attested by 1917. Related: Cramped; cramping.

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elusive (adj.)

"hard to grasp or confine," 1719, from Latin elus-, past-participle stem of eludere "elude, frustrate" (see elude) + -ive. Related: Elusiveness.

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