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conclusion (n.)

late 14c., "deduction or inference reached by reasoning, result of a discussion or examination," from Old French conclusion "conclusion, result, outcome," from Latin conclusionem (nominative conclusio), noun of action from past-participle stem of concludere "to shut up, enclose" (see conclude).

Also, from late 14c. "the end, termination, final part; closing passages of a speech or writing; final result, outcome." For foregone conclusion, see forego.

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inconclusive (adj.)
1660s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + conclusive. Related: Inconclusively. Inconclusion is "rare," perhaps because it could mean either "reaching no conclusion" or "reaching an unwarranted conclusion." Related: Inconclusiveness.
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conclusively (adv.)
1550s, "in conclusion," from conclusive + -ly (2). Meaning "decisively" is recorded from 1748.
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close (n.)

(klōz), late 14c., "act of closing, conclusion, termination," from close (v.). Also in early use "enclosure, enclosed space" (late 13c.), from Old French clos, noun use of the past participle. Specifically in music, "conclusion of a strain or passage," 1590s.

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epilogue (n.)

early 15c., epiloge, from Old French epilogue (13c.), from Latin epilogus, from Greek epilogos "a conclusion, conclusion of a speech, inference," from epi "upon, in addition" (see epi-) + logos "a speaking" (see -logy). Earliest English sense was theatrical.

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cadenza (n.)
"ornamental passage near the close of a song or solo," 1780, from Italian cadenza "conclusion of a movement in music" (see cadence (n.)).
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infer (v.)
in logic, "to 'bring in' as a conclusion of a process of reasoning," 1520s, from Latin inferre "bring into, carry in; deduce, infer, conclude, draw an inference; bring against," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + ferre "to carry, to bear," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry; to bear children." General sense of "draw a conclusion" is first attested 1520s; intransitive sense is from 1570s.
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postlude (n.)

1821, in music, an organ piece at the end of a church service, from post- + ending abstracted from prelude. General sense of "afterword, conclusion" is by 1928.

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upshot (n.)
1530s, from up (adj.) + shot (n.); originally, the final shot in an archery match, hence the figurative sense of "result, issue, conclusion" (c. 1600).
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wind-up (n.)
1570s, "conclusion or final adjustment and settlement of some matter," from verbal phrase wind up (see wind (v.1)). Baseball pitching sense attested from 1906.
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