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compare (v.)

c. 1400, "regard or treat as equal;" early 15c. "liken, make a comparison, represent as similar," from Old French comparer "to compare, liken" (12c.), from Latin comparare "to liken, to compare," from com "with, together" (see com-) + par "equal" (see par (n.)). Related: Compared; comparing.

From c. 1500 as "note the similarities and differences of." Intransitive sense "bear comparison" is from mid-15c. To compare notes is from 1708.

In phrase without compare (1620s, with similar phrasing to 1530s) it might be altered by folk etymology from compeer "rival" (with-outen compere is attested from c. 1400) or blended with it; Middle English had withouten comparacioun (mid-15c.), wyþe-oute comparisoun (mid-14c.).

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comparator (n.)

"apparatus for making comparisons," 1853, agent noun from Latin stem of compare.

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goombah (n.)
by 1984, from dialectal pronunciation of Italian compare "companion, godfather" (compare compadre).
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tryptic (adj.)
1877, from trypsin + -ic (compare pepsin/peptic).
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whimwham (n.)
"whimsical device, trifle," 1520s, of unknown origin; perhaps from Scandinavian (compare Old Norse hvima "to let the eyes wander," Norwegian kvima "to flutter"), or else an arbitrary native formation (compare flim-flam).
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Gallagher 
surname, from Irish Gallchobhar "foreign-help." Compare Galloway.
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enculturation (n.)
1948 (Herskovits), from en- (1) + culturation (compare acculturation).
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