Etymology
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coming (n.)

late 13c., "a drawing near or arrival," verbal noun from come (v.). From mid-15c. as a present-participle adjective, "approaching in space or time."

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attraction (n.)

c. 1400, attraccioun, originally medical, "action or property of drawing (diseased matter) to the surface," from Old French atraccion (13c.) and directly from Latin attractionem (nominative attractio) "a drawing together," noun of action from past-participle stem of attrahere "to draw, pull" (see attract).

It was extended by c. 1600 to magnetic forces; the figurative sense of "quality in a person which draws interest or imagination" is from c. 1600. The meaning "a thing which draws a crowd, interesting or amusing exhibition" is from 1829, a sense that developed in English and soon transferred to the French equivalent of the word.

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bisexuality (n.)

"attraction to both sexes" 1892, in translation of Krafft-Ebing; see bisexual + -ity. Earlier "quality of having the organs of both sexes" (1850).

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leprophilia (n.)

"strong abnormal attraction to people with leprosy," 1959 (Graham Greene), from combining form of leper (q.v.) + -philia. Related: Leprophil. Leprophobia is from 1888.

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feature (v.)

1755, "to resemble, have features resembling," from feature (n.). The sense of "make special display or attraction of" is 1888; entertainment sense from 1897. Related: Featured; featuring.

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necrophilia (n.)

"morbid attraction toward the dead," 1892, in Chaddock's translation of Krafft-Ebbing's "Psychopathia Sexualis," from necro- "death, corpse" + -philia. Related: Necrophilism (1864); necrophilous; necrophiliac.

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boardwalk (n.)

"walkway made of boards," 1864, American English, from board (n.1) + walk (n.). As a seaside attraction from 1881, first in reference to Atlantic City, N.J.

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gravitation (n.)

1640s in physics, "force that gives weight to objects," also figurative, "act of tending toward a center of attraction," from Modern Latin gravitare (see gravitate). Compare gravity.

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advent (n.)

"important arrival," 1742, an extended sense of Advent "season preceding Christmas" (in reference to the "coming" of Christ), which was in late Old English, from Latin adventus "a coming, approach, arrival," in Church Latin "the coming of the Savior," from past participle of advenire "arrive at, come to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + venire "to come" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come"). Related: Adventual.

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-philia 

word-forming element meaning "friendship, fondness, tendency toward," and in recent use "abnormal attraction to," from Greek philia "affection," from philos "loving," which is of uncertain origin. Related: -philic.

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