Etymology
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coinage (n.)

late 14c., "currency, coined money," from Old French coignage, from coignier "to coin," from coing "piece of money: (see coin (n.)). Meaning "act or process of coining money" is from early 15c.; sense "deliberate formation of a new word" is from 1690s, from a general sense of "something invented" (c. 1600).

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monetary (adj.)

1802, "pertaining to coinage or currency;" 1860, "pertaining to money;" from Late Latin monetarius "pertaining to money," originally "of a mint," from Latin moneta "mint; coinage" (see money (n.)). Related: Monetarily.

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tunesmith (n.)

1926, U.S. colloquial coinage, from tune (n.) + smith (n.).

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snollygoster 

1846, American English slang, fanciful coinage.

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jillion (n.)

by 1939, arbitrary coinage, modeled on million, etc. Compare zillion, gazillion.

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feudalism (n.)

a coinage of historians, attested from 1773; see feudal + -ism. Feudal system attested from 1736.

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popish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the Pope or the Roman Catholic Church," 1520s, a hostile coinage from Pope + -ish.

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bumptious (adj.)

"offensively assertive," 1803, probably a jocular slang coinage from bump on the pattern of fractious, etc. Related: Bumptiously; bumptiousness.

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fave (n.)

1938, perhaps a Variety magazine coinage, slang shortening of favorite (n.). Later also as an adjective.

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zillion (n.)

1942, arbitrary coinage with no definite numerical value; first recorded in Billboard magazine. Compare jillion, gazillion.

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