Etymology
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process (v.2)

"to go in procession," 1814, "A colloquial or humorous back-formation" from procession [OED]. Accent on second syllable. The earlier verb was procession (1540s).

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process (n.)

early 14c., proces, "fact of being carried on" (as in in process), from Old French proces "a journey; continuation, development; legal trial" (13c.) and directly from Latin processus "a going forward, advance, progress," from past-participle stem of procedere "go forward" (see proceed).

Meaning "course or method of action, continuous action or series of actions or events" is from mid-14c.; sense of "continuous and regular series of actions meant to accomplish some result" (the main modern sense) is from 1620s. Meaning "a projection from the main body of something," especially a natural appendage, is from 1570s. Legal sense of "course of action of a suit at law, the whole of the proceedings in any action at law" is attested from early 14c.; hence due process "fair treatment" at law, considered as a right (mid-15c.).

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process (v.1)

1530s, "begin legal action against, summon in a court of law," from French processer "to prosecute," from proces (see process (n.)). Meaning "prepare or treat by special process, subject to special process" is from 1881, from the noun in English. Of persons, "to register and examine," by 1935, in reference to the U.S. Army. Related: Processed; processing.

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cognitive (adv.)

1580s, "pertaining to cognition," with -ive + Latin cognit-, past participle stem of cognoscere "to get to know, recognize," from assimilated form of com "together" (see co-) + gnoscere "to know" (from PIE root *gno- "to know").

Taken over by psychologists and sociologists after c. 1940. Cognitive dissonance "psychological distress cause by holding contradictory beliefs or values" (1957) apparently was coined by U.S. social psychologist Leon Festinger, who developed the concept. Related: Cognitively.

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senses (n.)

"one's mental faculties, conscious cognitive powers, sanity," 1560s, from sense (n.). The meaning "faculties of physical sensation" is from 1590s.

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abuilding (adj.)
"in the process of being built," 1530s, from a- (1) + building (n.) in the "process of construction" sense.
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reprocess (v.)

also re-process, "subject again to a process," 1939, originally of manufactures, from re- "back, again" + process (v.). Related: Reprocessed; reprocessing.

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tanning (n.)
late 15c., "process of tanning leather," verbal noun from tan (v.). Intransitive sense "process of getting suntan" is from 1944.
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intellect (n.)
"the sum of the cognitive facilities (except sense or sense and imagination), the capacity for reasoning truth," late 14c. (but little used before 16c.), from Old French intellect "intellectual capacity" (13c.), and directly from Latin intellectus "discernment, a perception, understanding," noun use of past participle of intelligere "to understand, discern" (see intelligence). The Latin word was used to translate Greek nous "mind, thought, intellect" in Aristotle.
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miniaturization (n.)

"process of using technology to make something very small," 1947, from miniaturize + noun ending -ation. Minification in the sense "process of making smaller" is attested from 1904, on analogy of magnification.

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