Etymology
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coco (n.)

"palm tree," 1550s, from Spanish and Portuguese coco "grinning or grimacing face," on resemblance of the three depressions at the base of the shell to a monkey or human face. The earlier word for it was the Latinized form cocus, which sometimes was Englished as cocos.

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coconut (n.)

1610s, "fruit of the tropical palm tree," from coco + nut. In reference to the dried, shredded flesh of the nut used in cookery and confections, by 1830. Meaning "the head" is slang from 1834. Coconut-oil is attested from 1829.

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cocoa (n.)

"brown powder produced by grinding roasted seeds of the cacao, an American evergreen tree," 1788, originally the seeds themselves (1707), corruption (by influence of coco) of cacao. The confusion with coco was already underway in English when the printers of Johnson's dictionary ran together the entries for coco and cocoa, after which it has never been undone. Cocoa has been the regular spelling from c. 1800.

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Chanel 
Paris fashion house, founded by Gabrielle 'Coco' Chanel (1883-1971), French fashion designer and perfumier, who opened her first shop in 1909. The perfume Chanel No. 5 debuted in 1921.
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