Etymology
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around (adv., prep.)

c. 1300, "in circumference, in a circle, on every side," from phrase on round; see a- (1) + round (adj.). It was rare before 1600. In the sense of "here and there with no fixed direction" it is attested from 1776 in American English (British English prefers about).

As a preposition, "on or along a circuit," from late 14c.; "on all sides, encircling, about" from 1660s; of time, by 1873. To have been around "gained worldly experience" is from 1927, U.S. colloquial; to get around to it is from 1864.

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clown (n.)

1560s, clowne, also cloyne, "man of rustic or coarse manners, boor, peasant," a word of obscure origin; the original form and pronunciation are uncertain. Perhaps it is from Scandinavian dialect (compare Icelandic klunni "clumsy, boorish fellow;" Swedish kluns "a hard knob; a clumsy fellow," Danish klunt "log, block"), or from Low German (compare North Frisian klönne "clumsy person," Dutch kloen). OED describes it as "a word meaning originally 'clod, clot, lump', which like those words themselves ..., has been applied in various langs. to a clumsy boor, a lout."

The theory that it is from Latin colonus "colonist, farmer" is less likely, but awareness of the Latin word might have influenced the sense development in English.

Meaning "professional fool, professional or habitual jester" is c. 1600. "The pantomime clown represents a blend of the Shakes[pearean] rustic with one of the stock types of the It[alian] comedy" [Weekley]. Meaning "contemptible person" is from 1920s. Fem. form clowness attested from 1801.

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clown (v.)

c. 1600, "to play the clown onstage," from clown (n.); colloquial sense of "to behave inappropriately" (as in clown around, 1932) is attested by 1928, perhaps from the theatrical slang sense of "play a (non-comical) part farcically or comically" (1891). Related: Clowned; clowning.

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turn-around (n.)

also turnaround, 1936, from verbal phrase turn around "reverse," 1880, American English, from turn (v.) + around (adv.).

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clowning (n.)

"playing the clown," 1848, verbal noun from clown (v.).

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clownery (n.)

1580s, "condition or character of a clown; ill-breeding, rudeness of manners," from clown (n.) + -ery. From 1823 as "performance of a comic clown."

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clownish (adj.)

1560s, "rustic;" 1580s, "boorish, ungainly, awkward," from clown (n.) + -ish. Meaning "pertaining to or characteristic of a (stage) clown" is perhaps from c. 1600. Related: Clownishly; clownishness.

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clownage (n.)

1580s, "function or manners of a stage clown or jester," from clown (n.) + -age. From 1630s as "actions or behavior of a rustic."

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clownify (v.)

"make clownish or dull-witted," 1610s, from clown (n.) + -ify. Related: Clownified; clownifying.

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clumperton (n.)

"clown, clodhopper," 1530s, from clump (n.), probably on model of simpleton.

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