Etymology
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closing (n.)

late 14c., "act of closing; that which closes," verbal noun from close (v.). Closing-time is from 1841.

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close (v.)

(klōz), c. 1200, "to shut, cover in," from Old French clos- (past participle stem of clore "to shut, to cut off from"), 12c., from Latin clausus, past participle of claudere "to shut, close; to block up, make inaccessible; put an end to; shut in, enclose, confine" (always -clusus, -cludere in compounds), from PIE root *klau- "hook," also "peg, nail, pin," all things used as locks or bolts in primitive structures.

Also partly from Old English beclysan "close in, shut up." Intransitive sense "become shut" is from late 14c. Meaning "draw near to" is from 1520s. Intransitive meaning "draw together, come together" is from 1550s, hence the idea in military verbal phrase close ranks (mid-17c.), later with figurative extensions. Meaning "bring to an end, finish" is from c. 1400; intransitive sense "come to an end" is from 1826. Of stock prices, from 1860. Meaning "bring together the parts of" (a book, etc.) is from 1560s. Related: Closed; closing.

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nope (adv.)

1888, emphatic form of no, with emphasis on the closing of the lips.

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lidless (adj.)

1520s, from lid in the "eyelid" sense + -less; usually poetic, "sleepless, ever-vigilant," as if incapable of closing the eyes.

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occlusive (adj.)

"serving to close, having the function of closing," 1867, from Latin occlus-, past-participle stem of occludere (see occlude) + -ive.

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closure (n.)

late 14c., "a barrier, a fence," from Old French closure "enclosure; that which encloses, fastening, hedge, wall, fence," also closture "barrier, division; enclosure, hedge, fence, wall" (12c., Modern French clôture), from Late Latin clausura "lock, fortress, a closing" (source of Italian chiusura), from past participle stem of Latin claudere "to close" (see close (v.)).

Sense of "act of closing, a bringing to a close" is from early 15c. In legislation, especially "closing or stopping of debate" (compare cloture). Sense of "tendency to create ordered and satisfying wholes" is 1924, from Gestalt psychology.

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shut-off (n.)

1869, "something which shuts off;" 1889, "cessation of flow," from the verbal phrase, which is attested from 1824, "turn off, prevent the passage of (gas, steam) by closing a valve, etc."

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regards (n.)

as a closing in letters, "respects, good wishes," by 1775, from regard (n.) in the sense of "esteem, affection" (late 14c.).

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close (n.)

(klōz), late 14c., "act of closing, conclusion, termination," from close (v.). Also in early use "enclosure, enclosed space" (late 13c.), from Old French clos, noun use of the past participle. Specifically in music, "conclusion of a strain or passage," 1590s.

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interception (n.)

early 15c., "action of intercepting" (the flow of a bodily fluid), from Latin interceptionem (nominative interceptio) "a seizing, taking away," noun of action from past participle stem of intercipere (see intercept (v.)). Specific football/rugby sense is attested by 1897. Meaning "action of closing in on and destroying an enemy aircraft, etc." is recorded from 1939.

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