Etymology
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click (v.)

1580s, "cause to make a weak, sharp, sound" (transitive), of imitative origin (compare Dutch and East Frisian klikken "to click;" Old French clique "tick of a clock"). Intransitive sense "make a weak, sharp sound" is from 1610s.

The figurative sense, in reference usually to persons, "hit it off at once, become friendly upon meeting" is from 1915, perhaps based on the sound of a key in a lock. Mental figurative meaning "to fall into context" is by 1939. Related: Clicked; clicking.

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click (n.)

"a small, sharp sound," 1610s, from click (v.). As a sound in certain South African languages, 1837. Click-beetle attested from 1830, so called from its ability, when on its back, to spring into the air with an audible click.

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click-bait (n.)
internet content meant primarily to lure a viewer to click on it, by 2011, from click (n.) + bait (n.).
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clicker (n.)

"one who or that which 'clicks,' in any sense," agent noun from click (v.). Earliest attested sense is slang, "person employed by a shopkeeper to stand at the door and solicit customers" (1680s). It is still thus in Johnson (1755): "clicker. A low word for the servant of a salesman, who stands at the door to invite customers." By 1996 as "a remote control device to operate something (generally a television set) by the 'click' of a button."

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cliche (n.)

1825, "electrotype, stereotype," from French cliché, a technical word in printer's jargon for "stereotype block," noun use of past participle of clicher "to click" (18c.), supposedly echoic of the sound of a mold striking metal (compare native click).

Originally, a cast obtained by letting a matrix fall face downward upon a surface of molten metal on the point of cooling, called in English type-foundries 'dabbing.' [OED]

Figurative extension to "trite phrase, worn-out expression" is first attested 1888, via the notion of the metal plate from which a print or design could be reproduced endlessly without variety, paralleling the sense evolution of stereotype. But this sense was not common in English until the 1920s, when it was identified as a French idiom. Related: Cliched (1928).

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lickety-split (adj.)
1852, American English; earlier lickety-cut, lickety-click, and simply licketie (1817), probably a fanciful extension of lick (n.1) in its dialectal sense of "very fast sprint in a race" (1809) on the notion of a flick of the tongue as a fast thing (compare blink, snap).
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curare (n.)

formerly also curari, curara, resinous plant substance used by South American natives for poisoning their arrows, later used medicinally as a muscle relaxant, 1777, from Portuguese or Spanish curare, a corruption of the name in the Carib language of the Macusi Indians of Guyana, wurali or wurari, which had a sort of click sound at the beginning, and is said to mean "he to whom it comes falls" (when introduced into the blood the effect is almost instantly fatal).

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clique (n.)

1711, "an exclusive party of persons; a small set, especially one associating to arrogate power or privilege," from obsolete French clique, which meant originally (14c.) "a sharp noise," also "latch, bolt of a door," from Old French cliquer "click, clatter, crackle, clink," 13c., echoic. Apparently this word was at one time treated in French as the equivalent of claque (q.v.) and partook of that word's theatrical sense.

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aggie (n.2)

type of toy marble, by 1905, American English, colloquial shortening of agate (q.v.).

Excited groups gather about rude circles scratched in the mud, and there is talk of "pureys," and "reals," and "aggies," and "commies," and "fen dubs!" There is a rich click about the bulging pockets of the boys, and every so often in school time something drops on the floor and rolls noisily across the room. When Miss Daniels asks: "Who did that?" the boys all look so astonished. Who did what pray tell? [McClure's magazine, May 1905]
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