Etymology
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cinema (n.)

1899, "a movie hall," from French cinéma, shortened from cinématographe "device for projecting a series of photographs in rapid succession so as to produce the illusion of movement," coined 1890s by Lumiere brothers, who invented the technology, from Latinized form of Greek kinemat-, combining form of kinema "movement," from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + graphein "to write" (see -graphy).

The word was earlier in English in its fuller form, cinematograph (1896), but this has been displaced by the short form. Other old words for such a system were vitascope (Edison, 1895), animatograph (1898). Meaning "movies collectively, especially as an art form" recorded by 1914. Cinéma vérité is 1963, from French.

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cinematic (adj.)

1914, "of or pertaining to movies," from French cinématique (by 1902), from cinéma (see cinema). Earlier (1883) it was a variant form of kinematic (see kinematics). Related: Cinematically.

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Cinerama (n.)

proprietary name for a form of cinema film projected on a wide, curved screen, 1951, from cinema + -rama. Purists point out that the proper formation would be *Cinorama.

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Roxy 

cinema chain built by U.S. entertainment mogul Samuel L. "Roxy" Rothafel (1882-1936).

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kinema (n.)

former alternative spelling of cinema, with the Greek k-.

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cinematographer (n.)

1897, "one who takes cinematic pictures," agent noun from cinematograph "motion picture projector" (see cinema).

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screenwriter (n.)

"writer of film scripts," 1921, from screen (n.) in the cinema sense + writer.

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verity (n.)

late 14c., from Anglo-French and Old French verite "truth, sincerity, loyalty" (12c.), from Latin veritatem (nominative veritas) "truth, truthfulness," from verus "true" (from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy"). Modern French vérité, literally "truth," was borrowed into English 1966 as a term for naturalism or realism in film, etc.

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CinemaScope (n.)

1953, proprietary name for wide-screen movie technology; see cinema + scope (n.2).

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odeon (n.)

1902, in the classical sense, from Greek ōideion "building for musical performance," from Greek ōidē "song, ode" (see ode). The chain of lavish cinema theaters operated under that name by 1930 (the name had been used earlier for cinema theaters in France and Italy).

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