Etymology
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cinch (n.)

1859, American English, "saddle-girth," from Spanish cincha "girdle," from Latin cingulum "a girdle, a swordbelt," from cingere "to surround, encircle," from PIE root *kenk- (1) "to gird, encircle" (source also of Sanskrit kankate "binds," kanci "girdle;" Lithuanian  kinkau, kinkyti "to harness horses"). Replaced earlier surcingle. Sense of "an easy thing" is 1895 (in lead-pipe cinch), via notion of "a firm or sure hold" (1888).

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cinch (v.)

1866, "to pull in, gird with or as with a cinch," from cinch (n.). Figurative meaning "make certain" is from 1891, American English slang, via Western U.S. colloquial sense "bind or subdue by force" (1875). Related: Cinched; cinching.

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surcingle (n.)

"girth for a horse" or other animal, late 14c., from Old French surcengle, from sur- "over" (see sur- (1)) + cengle "a girdle," from Latin cingulum "girth" (see cinch (n.)).

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cincture (n.)

"belt, girdle, or band worn round the body," 1580s, from Latin cinctura "a girdle," from cinctus, past participle of cingere "to surround, encircle" (see cinch (n.)). Especially the girdle used to confine a clergyman's cassock. The verb is recorded from 1757 (implied in cinctured).

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precinct (n.)

c. 1400, prasaynt (mid-15c. as precincte), "district defined for purposes of government or representation," especially in a city or town, from Medieval Latin precinctum "enclosure, boundary line," noun use of neuter past participle of Latin praecingere "to gird about, surround," from prae "before" (see pre-) + cingere "to surround, encircle" (see cinch (v.)). The meaning "exterior line or boundary encompassing a place" is from 1540s.

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succinct (adj.)
Origin and meaning of succinct

early 15c., "having one's belt fastened tightly," from Latin succinctus "prepared, ready; contracted, short," past participle of succingere "tuck up (clothes for action), gird from below," from assimilated form of sub "up from under" (see sub-) + cingere "to gird" (see cinch (n.)). Sense of "brief, concise" first recorded 1530s. Related: Succinctness.

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shingles (n.)

"inflammatory disease of the skin," late 14c., from Medieval Latin cingulus, a variant of Latin cingulum "girdle," from cingere "to gird" (see cinch (n.)). The medical use of the word in Medieval Latin is a loan-translation of Greek zōstēr, literally "girdle." The inflammation was so called because it often extends around the middle of the body, like a girdle. Perhaps it was reinforced in English by the plural of French cengle "shingles," literally "belt, fence," from the same Latin word.

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enceinte (adj.)

"pregnant, with child," c. 1600, insente, from French enceinte "pregnant" (12c.), from Late Latin incincta (source of Italian incinta), explained by Isidore of Seville (7c.) as "ungirt," from Latin in- "not" (see in- (1)), + cincta, fem. of cinctus, past participle of cingere "to gird" (see cinch). But the Late Latin word is more likely from Latin inciens "pregnant," from in- (2) "in, into" + second element from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole." Modern form is from 18c., perhaps a reborrowing from French.

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rivet (n.)

c. 1300, "cinch on a nail;" c. 1400, "short metal pin or bolt inserted through a hole at the junction of two or more metal pieces," the point then hammered broad to hold them together; from Old French rivet "nail, rivet," from river "to clench, fix, fasten," which is of uncertain origin; possibly from Middle Dutch wriven "turn, grind," and thus related to rive (v.). Or the English word might be directly from Middle Dutch.

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