Etymology
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childbirth (n.)

also child-birth, "act of bringing forth a child, labor," mid-15c., from child + birth (n.).

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lochia (n.)
"discharge from the uterus after childbirth," 1680s, Modern Latin, from Greek lokhia "childbirth," neuter plural of lokhios "pertaining to childbirth," from lokhos "a lying in, childbirth," also, "an ambush," from PIE root *legh- "to lie down, lay." Related: Lochial. Greek Lokhia also was an epithet or surname of Artemis in her aspect as protectress of women in childbirth; in this case it is the fem. of the adjective lokhios.
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Lamaze (adj.)
in reference to a method of childbirth technique, 1957, named for French obstetrician Dr. Fernand Lamaze (1891-1957), who promoted his methods of "psycho-prophylaxis," a form of childbirth preparation he had studied in the Soviet Union, in the West in the early 1950s.
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colostrum (n.)

"the first milk secreted in the breasts after childbirth," 1570s, from Latin colostrum "first milk from an animal," earlier colustra, a word of unknown etymology.

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obstetrics (n.)

"science of midwifery, the department of medicine which deals with the treatment and care of women during pregnancy and childbirth," 1819, from obstetric (adj.); also see -ics.

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puerperium (n.)

"confinement during and after childbirth," 1863, from Latin puerperus (see puerperal). From c. 1600 in navitized form puerpery.

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delivery (n.)

early 15c., "act of setting free from bondage," also "action of handing over to another," from Anglo-French delivrée, noun use of fem. past participle of Old French delivrer (see deliver). Sense of "childbirth, giving forth of offspring" is by 1570s; that of "manner of utterance or enunciation" is from 1660s. Of a blow, throw of a ball, etc., "act of sending or putting forth," from 1702. The hospital's childbirth delivery room is attested by 1849 (in early use often in a German context, translating Kreisszimmer).

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confinement (n.)

1620s, "state of being confined; any restraint by force, necessity, or obstacle," from French confinement (16c.; the Old French word was confinacion), from confiner "to border; to shut up, enclose" (see confine).

As "restraint from going abroad by childbirth," perhaps a euphemism for childbed it dates from 1774 (the Middle English expression was Our Lady's bands). To be confined "be unable to leave the house or bed from sickness or childbirth" is attested from 1772.

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Lucina 
Roman goddess of childbirth, late 14c., from Latin Lucina, literally "she that brings to the light," fem. of lucinus, from luc-, stem of lux "light" (see light (n.)).
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epidural (adj.)
1873, "situated on or affecting the dura mater," from epi- "on" + dura mater + -al (1). The noun meaning "injection into the epidural region" (usually given during childbirth) is attested by 1966.
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