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objurgation (n.)

c. 1500, objurgacioun, "act of scolding or rebuking," from Old French objurgacion (15c.) and directly from Latin obiurgationem (nominative obiurgatio) "a chiding, reproving, reproof," noun of action from past-participle stem of obiurgare (see objurgate). Related: Objurgate; objurgative; objurgatory.

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increpation (n.)
"a chiding, a rebuking, censure," c. 1500, from Late Latin increpationem (nominative increpatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin increpare "to make noise at, scold, nag, upbraid," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + crepare "to creak" (see raven (n.)).
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chide (v.)

late 12c., "scold, nag, rail," originally intransitive, from Old English cidan "to contend, quarrel, complain." Not found outside Old English (though Liberman says it is "probably related to OHG *kîdal 'wedge,'" with a sense evolution from "brandishing sticks" to "scold, reprove").

Originally a weak verb, later strong constructions are by influence of ride/rode, etc. Past tense, past participle can be chided or chid or even (past participle) chidden (Shakespeare used it); present participle is chiding.

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