Etymology
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property (n.)

c. 1300, properte, "nature, quality, distinctive character always present in an individual or class," later "possession, land or goods owned, things subject to ownership" (early 14c., but this sense is rare before 17c.), from an Anglo-French modification of Old French proprete, "individuality, peculiarity; property" (12c., Modern French propreté) and directly from Latin proprietatem (nominative proprietas) "ownership, a property, propriety, quality," literally "special character" (a loan-translation of Greek idioma), noun of quality from proprius "one's own, special" (see proper). Compare propriety, which is another form of the same French word.

For "possessions, private property" Middle English sometimes used proper goods. Hot property "sensation, a success" is from 1947 in stories in Billboard magazine.

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chemical (n.)

"a substance produced by a chemical process, a chemical agent," 1747, from chemical (adj.). Related: Chemicals.

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chemical (adj.)

1570s, "relating to chemistry, pertaining to the phenomena with which chemistry deals," from chemic "of alchemy" (a worn-down derivative of Medieval Latin alchimicus; see alchemy) + -al (1). In early use also of alchemy. Related: Chemically. Chemical warfare is attested from 1917.

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polymerization (n.)

"the property of certain compounds by virtue of which they differ in molecular weight and chemical properties though formed from the same elements in the same proportion," 1866, from polymer + -ization.

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polymerism (n.)

in chemistry, "that property of certain compounds by which they differ in molecular weight and chemical properties though formed from the same elements in the same proportion," 1833, from Greek polymerēs "having many parts" (see polymer) + -ism.

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photochemical (adj.)

1859, "of or pertaining to the chemical action of light," from photo- + chemical. Related: Photochemically.

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guanine (n.)
1846, from guano, from which the chemical first was isolated, + chemical suffix -ine (2).
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physicochemical (adj.)

also physico-chemical, "pertaining to or relating to both physics and chemistry," 1660s, from physico- + chemical (adj.).

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-one 
chemical suffix, from Greek -one, female patronymic (as in anemone, "daughter of the wind," from anemos); in chemical use denoting a "weaker" derivative. Its use in forming acetone (1830s) gave rise to the specialized chemical sense.
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ibogaine (n.)
nerve stimulant, 1901, from French ibogaine, from iboga, Congolese name of the shrub from which the chemical is extracted, + chemical suffix -ine (2).
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