Etymology
Advertisement
ceremonial (adj.)

c. 1400, "belonging to (religious) ritual," also as a noun, "a ceremonial practice," from Late Latin caerimonialis "pertaining to ceremony," from caerimonia (see ceremony). Related: Ceremonially.

Ceremonial means connected with or constituting or consisting of or fit for a ceremony (i.e. a piece of ritual or formality) or ceremonies .... Ceremonious means full of or resulting from ceremony i.e. attention to forms .... [Fowler]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
occasion (v.)

mid-15c., occasionen, "to bring (something) about, be the cause of (something)," from occasion (n.), or else from Old French occasionner "to cause," from Medieval Latin occasionare, from Latin occasionem (see occasion (n.)). Related: Occasioned; occasioning.

Related entries & more 
occasion (n.)

late 14c., occasioun, "opportunity; grounds for action or feeling; state of affairs that makes something else possible; a happening, occurrence leading to some result," from Old French ochaison, ocasion "cause, reason, excuse, pretext; opportunity" (13c.) or directly from Latin occasionem (nominative occasio) "opportunity, appropriate time," in Late Latin "cause," from occasum, occasus, past participle of occidere "fall down, go down," from ob "down, away" (see ob-) + -cidere, combining form of cadere "to fall" (from PIE root *kad- "to fall"). The notion is of a "falling together," or juncture, of circumstances. The sense of "the time or a time at which something happens" is from 1560s.

Related entries & more 
occasionally (adv.)
c. 1400, "happening on some particular occasion," also "sometimes, happening as occasion presents itself, without regularity," from occasional + -ly (2).
Related entries & more 
leant 
occasion past tense and past participle of lean (v.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
all-purpose (adj.)
"suitable for every use or occasion," 1877, from all + purpose (n.).
Related entries & more 
challah (n.)

type of bread, usually braided, typically eaten on Jewish ceremonial occasions, 1887, from Yiddish khale, from Hebrew chala, which is possibly from hll "hollow, pierce," and perhaps is a reference to the original appearance of it.

Related entries & more 
Talmud (n.)
body of Jewish traditional ceremonial and civil law, 1530s, from late Hebrew talmud "instruction" (c. 130 C.E.), from lamadh "he learned." Related: Talmudic; Talmudist.
Related entries & more 
stateroom (n.)
also state-room, 1703, room reserved for ceremonial occasions; earlier (1650s) "a captain's cabin;" from room (n.) + state (n.1) in a sense also preserved in stately.
Related entries & more 
inapt (adj.)
"ill-suited to the purpose or occasion," 1734, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + apt. Related: Inaptly; inaptness. Compare inept.
Related entries & more