Etymology
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exciting (adj.)
1811, "causing disease," present-participle adjective from excite (v.). Sense of "causing excitement" is from 1826. Related: Excitingly.
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prepossessing (adj.)

1640s, "causing bias or prejudice, predisposing the mind to favor," present-participle adjective from prepossess. Opposite meaning "causing agreeable first impression" is attested by 1805.

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violative (adj.)
"tending to or causing violation," 1765, from violate + -ive.
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asphyxiation (n.)
"act of causing asphyxia," 1849, noun of action from asphyxiate (v.).
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beautification (n.)
"act of making beautiful," 1630s, from beauty + -fication "a making or causing."
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wearisome (adj.)
mid-15c., "weary," also "causing weariness," from weary + -some (1).
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opafication (n.)
1852, from French opafication; see opacity + -fication "a making or causing."
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worrisome (adj.)
"causing worry or annoyance," 1828, from worry + -some (1). Related: Worrisomely.
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disgusting (adj.)

"causing disgust, offensive to the taste physically, morally, or aesthetically," 1754, present-participle adjective from disgust (v.). Related: Disgustingly. Disgustful "causing disgust" (1610s) was "Very common in 17-18th c." [OED].

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