Etymology
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cater (v.)

c. 1600,  "provide food for," from Middle English catour (n.) "buyer of provisions" (c. 1400; late 13c. as a surname), a shortening of Anglo-French achatour "buyer" (Old North French acatour, Old French achatour, 13c., Modern French acheteur), from Old French achater "to buy," originally "to buy provisions," perhaps from Vulgar Latin *accaptare, from Latin ad- "to" (see ad-) + captare "to take, hold," frequentative of capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp."

Or else from Vulgar Latin *accapitare "to add to one's capital," with second element from verbal stem of Latin caput (genitive capitis); see capital (adj.). Figuratively, "act as a purveyor," from 1650s. Related: Catered; catering.

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cornered (adj.)

late 14c., "having corners," past-participle adjective from corner (v.). Figurative sense "forced or driven into a position where surrender or defeat is inevitable" is from 1824.

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catty-cornered (adj., adv.)

1838, earlier cater-cornered (1835, American English), from now-obsolete cater "to set, cut, or move diagonally" (1570s), from French catre "four," from Latin quattuor (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four"). Compare carrefour. Related: Catty-corner; cattycorner.

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kitty-corner 

also kittycorner, kitty-cornered, kittycornered, etc., see catty-cornered.

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caterer (n.)

"provider of food or provisions," mid-15c., earlier simply cater (see cater (v.)). With redundant -er (compare poulterer, sorcerer, upholsterer).

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caterwaul (v.)

"disagreeable howling or screeching," like that of a cat in heat, late 14c., caterwrawen, perhaps from Low German katerwaulen "cry like a cat," or formed in English from cater, from Middle Dutch cater "tomcat" + Middle English waul "to yowl," apparently from Old English *wrag, *wrah "angry," of uncertain origin but somehow imitative. Related: Caterwauled; caterwauling. As a noun from 1708.

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popularize (v.)

"to make a complex topic intelligible to the common people," 1833; see popular + -ize. Earlier "to cater to popular taste" (1590s); "to make popular" (1797). Related: Popularized; popularizer; popularizing.

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hexagon (n.)

1560s, from Latin hexagonum, from Greek hexagonon, neuter of hexagonos "six-cornered, hexagonal," from hex "six" (see hexa-) + gōnia "angle, corner" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle").

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pander (v.)

"to indulge (another), to minister to base passions, cater for the lusts of others," c. 1600, from pander (n.). Meaning "to minister to others' prejudices for selfish ends" is from c. 1600. Related: Pandered; panderer; pandering.

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triangle (n.)
late 14c., from Old French triangle (13c.), from Latin triangulum "triangle," noun use of neuter of adjective triangulus "three-cornered, having three angles," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + angulus "corner, angle" (see angle (n.)).
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