Etymology
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cassette (n.)

1793, "a little box," from French cassette, from a diminutive of Old North French casse "box" (see case (n.2)). Meaning "magnetic tape cartridge" is from 1960.

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deck (v.1)
Origin and meaning of deck

"adorn, array or clothe with something ornamental" (as in deck the halls), early 15c., from Middle Dutch decken "to cover, put under roof," a nautical word, from Proto-Germanic *thakjan (source also of Old Frisian thekka, Old High German decchan, German decken), from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover." Meaning "to cover, overspread" is from 1510s in English. Replaced Middle English thecchen, from Old English eccan(see thatch (v.), which is a doublet).Related: Decked; decking.

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deck (v.2)

"to knock down," by 1955, probably from deck (n.) on the notion of laying someone out on a ship's deck. Compare floor (v.) "to knock down." Related: Decked; decking.

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deck (n.)
Origin and meaning of deck

mid-15c., dekke, "covering extending from side to side over part of a ship," from a nautical use of Middle Dutch dec, decke "roof, covering," from Proto-Germanic *thakam (source also of thatch (n.)), from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover."

Sense extended early in English from "covering" to "platform of a ship." Meaning "pack of cards necessary to play a game" is from 1590s, perhaps because they were stacked like decks of a ship. Tape-deck (1949) is in reference to the flat surface of old reel-to-reel tape recorders. 

Deck-chair (1844) so called because they were used on ocean liners. On deck (by 1740) was in nautical use especially "ready for action or duty;" extended sense in baseball, of a batter waiting a turn at the plate, is by 1867. To clear the deck (1852) is to prepare a ship for action; it is perhaps a translation of French débarasser le pont.

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deck-hand (n.)

"person regularly employed as a laborer on the deck of a vessel," 1839, American English, from deck (n.) in the nautical sense + hand (n.) "manual worker."

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quarter-deck (n.)

1620s, "the part of the spar-deck of a man-of-war between the poop and the main-mast," originally "a smaller deck above the half-deck," covering about a quarter of the vessel [OED], from quarter (n.1).

"It is used as a promenade by the officers only" [Century Dictionary], hence the colloquial nautical noun quarter-decker (by 1867) "an officer who is more looked upon as a stickler for small points of etiquette than as a thorough seaman."

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videocassette (n.)
1970, from video + cassette. Videocassette recorder is from 1971, usually VCR (also 1971), now a period piece.
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poop (n.1)

"stern or aftermost deck of a ship," c. 1400, from Old French poupe "stern of a ship" (14c.), from Old Provençal or Italian poppa, from Latin puppis "poop, stern," a word of uncertain origin. Also "a deck above the ordinary deck on the aftermost part of a ship." As a verb, "to break heavily over the stern of a ship" (of waves, etc.). Poop deck is attested by 1779.

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bedeck (v.)
"to adorn," 1560s, from be- + deck (v.). Related: Bedecked; bedecking.
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