Etymology
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carious (adj.)
"decayed" (of tooth or bone), 1670s, from French carieux (16c.), from Latin cariosus "full of decay," from caries "rottenness, decay" (see caries). Extended sense of "having a corroded appearance" is by 1832.
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caries (n.)

1630s, "destructive disease of bone," from Latin caries "rottenness, decay," from Proto-Italic *kas-, usually said to be from PIE root *kere- "to injure, break apart" (source also of Greek ker "death, destruction," Old Irish krin "withered, faded"). Related: Carious. But de Vaan writes that "semantically, caries may just as well belong to careocared 'to lack' as 'defect, state of defectiveness' ...." Of teeth by 1826.

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