Etymology
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carl (n.)

c. 1300, "bondsman; common man, man of low birth," from Old Norse karl "man (as opposed to "woman"), male, freeman," from Proto-Germanic *karlon- (source also of Dutch karel "a fellow," Old High German karl "a man, husband), the same base that produced Old English ceorl "man of low degree" (see churl) and the masc. proper name Carl.

The Mellere was a stout carle for the nones [Chaucer]
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Carl 
masc. proper name, from continental sources such as Danish Carl, Middle High German Karl, from the common noun meaning "man, husband" (see carl). The Carlists in 19c. Spain were partisans of Don Carlos de Borbon.
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Jungian (adj.)
1921, "of or pertaining to the psychoanalytic school of Dr. Carl Gustav Jung" (1875-1961); for suffix, see -ian.
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lanthanum (n.)
metallic rare earth element, 1841, coined in Modern Latin by Swedish chemist and mineralogist Carl Gustav Mosander (1797-1858), who discovered it in 1839, from Greek lanthanein "to lie hidden, escape notice," from PIE root *ladh- "to be hidden" (see latent). So called because the element was "concealed" in the earth from which he extracted it.
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extrovert (n.)

"outgoing, overtly expressive person," 1916, extravert (spelled with -o- after 1918, by influence of introvert), from German Extravert, from extra "outside" (see extra-) + Latin vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). Used (with introvert) in English by doctors and scientists in various literal senses since 1600s, but popularized in a psychological sense early 20c. by Carl Jung. Related: Extroverted.

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synchronicity (n.)
1953; from synchronic + -ity. Originally in Jung. Synchroneity is from 1889, but equally malformed, and see synchronism.
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Carla 
fem. proper name, fem. of Carl.
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Faberge (adj.)
1902 from Peter Carl Fabergé (1846-1920), Russian jeweler.
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complex (n.)

1650s, "a whole comprised of interconnected parts," from complex (adj.). Latin completus as a noun meant "a surrounding, embracing, connection, relation." Psychological sense of "connected group of repressed ideas" was established by C.G. Jung, 1907.

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