Etymology
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No results were found for carex pseudocyperus. Showing results for cares.
cares (n.)
"anxieties," late Old English, from care (n.).
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care-worn (adj.)
also careworn, "oppressed or burdened with cares," 1828, from care (n.) + worn.
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worry (n.)
Origin and meaning of worry
"anxiety arising from cares and troubles," 1804, from worry (v.).
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baby-farmer (n.)
"one who cares for the infants of those unable or unwilling to do so themselves," 1868, from baby (n.) + farmer. Related: Baby-farm.
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care-free (adj.)
also carefree, "free from cares," 1795, from care (n.) + free (adj.). In Old English and Middle English this idea was expressed by careless.
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relaxation (n.)

late 14c., relaxacioun, "a rupture, a hernia" (a sense now obsolete); mid-15c., "remission of a burden or penalty," from Old French relaxacion (14c.) and directly from Latin relaxationem (nominative relaxatio) "an easing, mitigation, relaxation," noun of action from past-participle stem of relaxare "loosen, open, stretch out" (see relax).

Meaning "relief from hard work or ordinary cares; a state or occupation intended to give mental or bodily relief after effort or ordinary occupations and cares" is from 1540s. Sense of "remission or abatement of rigor or intensity" is from 1690s.

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sorrow (n.)

Old English sorg "grief, regret, trouble, care, pain, anxiety," from Proto-Germanic *sorg- (source also of Old Saxon sorga, Old Norse sorg, Middle Dutch sorghe, Dutch zorg, Old High German soraga, German sorge, Gothic saurga), perhaps from PIE *swergh- "to worry, be sick" (source also of Sanskrit surksati "cares for," Lithuanian sergu, sirgti "to be sick," Old Church Slavonic sraga "sickness," Old Irish serg "sickness"). Not connected etymologically with sore (adj.) or sorry.

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selfish (adj.)

"caring only for self; characteristic of one who cares only or chiefly for his own personal pleasure," 1630s, from self + -ish. It is common in Baxter and said by Bishop Hacket ("Scrinia Reserata," 1693) to have been coined by Presbyterians. 17c. synonyms included self-seeking (1620s), self-ended (1640s, from self-end, "personal or private object"), and self-ful (1650s).

Let us understand what our own selfish genes are up to, because we may then at least have the chance to upset their designs. [Richard Dawkins, "The Selfish Gene," 1976]

Related: Selfishly; selfishness. Similar formations in German selbstisch, Swedish sjelfvisk, Danish selvisk.

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caress (n.)
1640s, "a show of endearment, display of regard," from French caresse (16c.), back-formation from caresser or else from Italian carezza "endearment," from caro "dear," from Latin carus "dear, costly, beloved" (from PIE root *ka- "to like, desire"). Meaning "affectionate stroke" attested in English from 1650s. Related to charity, cherish.
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caress (v.)
"bestow caresses upon, stroke or pat affectionately;" also "treat with fondness or kindness," 1650s, from French caresser, from Italian carezzare "to cherish," from carezza "endearment" (see caress (n.)). Related: Caressed; caressing.
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