Etymology
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Canadian (adj.)

"pertaining to Canada," 1560s; see Canada. Also as a noun, "native or inhabitant of Canada" (1759).

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Canadianism (n.)
"national spirit of Canadians," 1875, from Canadian + -ism.
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joual (n.)
"colloquial Canadian French," 1959, from "joual," the colloquial Canadian French pronunciation of French cheval "horse" (see cavalier (n.)). The term was brought to attention by Quebec journalist André Laurendeau.
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travois (n.)
type of American Indian transport, 1847, said to be ultimately from a Canadian Indian pronunciation of travail.
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lumberjack (n.)
1831, Canadian English, from lumber (n.) + jack (n.) "man, fellow." Lumberman in the same sense is from 1817.
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tuque (n.)
type of cap worn in Canada, 1871, from Canadian French variant of French toque (see toque).
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Canuck (n.)
U.S. word for "a Canadian," especially a French-Canadian, 1835, perhaps a cross between Canada and Chinook, the native people in the Columbia River region. Often, but not always, more or less slighting. As an adjective from 1853. The NHL team in Vancouver joined the league in 1970; the name had been used by a minor league franchise there from 1945.
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Manitoba 
Canadian province, named for the lake, which was named for an island in the lake; from Algonquian manitou "great spirit" (see manitou).
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bateau (n.)
"light, long boat for river navigation," 1711, from Canadian French bateau, from Old French batel, from Germanic *bait- "a boat" (see boat (n.)).
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Micmac 
Algonquian tribe of the Canadian Maritimes and Newfoundland, by 1776, from mi:kemaw, a native name said to mean literally "allies."
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