Etymology
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Cambridge 
city in eastern England, Old English Grontabricc (c. 745) "Bridge on the River Granta" (a Celtic river name, of obscure origin). The change to Cante- and later Cam- was due to Norman influence. The river name Cam is a back-formation in this case, but Cam also was a legitimate Celtic river name, meaning "crooked." The university dates to 1209. Cambridge in Massachusetts, U.S., originally was New Towne but was renamed 1638 after the founding there of Harvard College, John Harvard being a graduate of Cambridge in England.
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Cantabrigian (adj.)
"pertaining to Cambridge," 1540s, from Medieval Latin Cantabrigia (see Cambridge) + -an. Shortened form Cantab is attested from 1750 as "member or graduate of the University of Cambridge."
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Oxbridge 

1849, a conflation of Oxford and Cambridge, used in reference to the characteristics common to the two universities. Camford also has been used.

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Hobson's choice (n.)
English university slang term, supposedly a reference to Thomas Hobson (c. 1544-1631), Cambridge stable manager who let horses and gave customers a choice of the horse next in line or none at all. Phrase popularized c. 1660 by Milton, who was at Cambridge from 1625-29.
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Venn diagram (n.)
1918 (Venn's diagram is from 1904), named for English logician John Venn (1834-1923) of Cambridge, who explained them in the book "Symbolic Logic" (1881).
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crony (n.)

"old familiar friend, intimate companion," 1660s, chrony, Cambridge student slang, probably from Greek khronios "long-lasting," from khronos "time" (see chrono-), on the notion of "old friend" or "a contemporary."

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hoopoe (n.)

1660s, from Latin upupa, imitative of its cry (compare Greek epops "hoopoe," Polish dudek, Russian udodu).

If anybody smears himself with the blood of this bird on his way to bed, he will have nightmares about suffocating devils. [Cambridge bestiary, 12c.]
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row (n.2)

"noisy commotion," 1746, Cambridge student slang, of uncertain origin, perhaps related to rousel "drinking bout" (c. 1600), a shortened form of carousal. Klein suggests a back-formation from rouse (n.), mistaken as a plural (compare pea from pease).

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Bartlett 

U.S. name for a variety of pear, 1835, named for Enoch Bartlett, who first distributed them in the U.S. The quotation collection is named for U.S. bookstore owner John Bartlett of Cambridge, Massachusetts, who first printed his "A Collection of Familiar Quotations" in 1855.

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toff (n.)
lower-class London slang for "stylish dresser, man of the smart set," 1851, said by OED to be probably an alteration of tuft, formerly an Oxford University term for a nobleman or gentleman-commoner (1755), in reference to the gold ornamental tassel worn on the caps of undergraduates at Oxford and Cambridge whose fathers were peers with votes in the House of Lords.
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