Etymology
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communion (n.)

late 14c., communioun, "participation in something; that which is common to all; union in religious worship, doctrine, or discipline," from Old French comunion "community, communion" (12c.), from Latin communionem (nominative communio) "fellowship, mutual participation, a sharing," used in Late Latin ecclesiastical language for "participation in the sacrament," from communis "common, general" (see common (adj.)).

Used by Augustine, in belief that the word was derived from com- "with, together" + unus "oneness, union." In English, from mid-15c. as "the sacrament of the Eucharist," from c. 1500 as "act of partaking in the sacrament of the Eucharist." From 1610s as "intercourse between two or more."

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intercommunion (n.)
1749, "intimate intercourse, fellowship," from inter- "between" + communion (n.).
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communicant (n.)

"one who takes communion," 1550s, from Latin communicantem (nominative communicans), present participle of communicare (see communication, and compare communion).

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excommunication (n.)

"a cutting off or casting out from communication, deprivation of communion or the privileges of intercourse," specifically the formal exclusion of a person from religious communion and privileges, mid-15c., from Late Latin excommunicationem (nominative excommunicatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of excommunicare "put out of the community," in Church Latin "to expel from communion," from ex "out" (see ex-) + communicare "to share, communicate," related to communis "common" (see common (adj.)).

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non-communicant (n.)

"one who does not receive the holy communion," c. 1600, from non- + communicant.

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koinonia (n.)
"Christian fellowship," 1865, Greek, literally "communion, fellowship," from koinos "common, ordinary" (see coeno-).
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Zwinglian (adj.)
1532, after Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), Swiss Protestant reformer who revolted from the Roman communion in 1516 but who differed from Luther on theological points relating to the real presence in the Eucharist.
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omphaloskepsis (n.)

1925, from omphalo- + Greek -skepsis, from skeptesthai "to reflect, look, view" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Also omphaloscopy (1931). Used earlier in the sense of "navel-gazer" were omphalopsychic (1892) and Omphalopsychite (1882) "one of a body of monks who believed the deep contemplation of the navel induced communion with God," a derisive name given to the Hesychasts.

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solidarity (n.)
1829, from French solidarité "communion of interests and responsibilities, mutual responsibility," a coinage of the "Encyclopédie" (1765), from solidaire "interdependent, complete, entire," from solide (see solid (adj.)). With a capital S-, the name of an independent trade union movement in Poland, formed September 1980, from Polish Solidarność.
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Kyrie eleison 
early 13c., a Greek liturgical formula adopted untranslated into the Latin mass, literally "lord have mercy" (Psalms cxxii.3, Matthew xv.22, xvii.15, etc.). From kyrie, vocative of kyrios "lord, master" (see church (n.)) + eleeson, aorist imperative of eleo "I have pity on, show mercy to," from eleos "pity, mercy" (see alms). Hence, the corresponding part of a musical setting of the Mass or Anglican Communion.
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