Etymology
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burgeon (v.)
early 14c., "grow, sprout, blossom," from Anglo-French burjuner, Old French borjoner "to bud, sprout," from borjon "a bud, shoot, pimple" (Modern French bourgeon), a word of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Vulgar Latin *burrionem (nominative *burrio), from Late Latin burra "flock of wool," itself of uncertain origin. Some sources (Kitchin, Gamillscheg) say either the French word or the Vulgar Latin one is from Germanic (compare Old High German burjan "to raise, lift up"). The English verb is perhaps instead a native development from burjoin (n.) "a bud" (c. 1300), from Old French. According to OED, it died out by 18c. except as a technical term in gardening, and was revived early 19c. in poetry. Related: Burgeoned; burgeoning.
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forth (adv.)
Old English forð "forward, onward, farther; continually;" as a preposition, "during," perfective of fore, from Proto-Germanic *furtha- "forward" (source also of Old Frisian, Old Saxon forth "forward, onward," Old Norse forð, Dutch voort, German fort), from extended form of PIE root *per- (1) "forward." The construction in and so forth was in Old English.
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henceforth (adv.)
late 14c., earlier henne forth (late Old English); see hence + forth.
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viviparous (adj.)

1640s, from Late Latin viviparus "bringing forth alive," from Latin vivus "alive, living" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + parire "bring forth, bear" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, bring forth"). See viper.

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biparous (adj.)

"bringing forth two at birth," 1731, from bi- "two" + Latin -parus, from parire "bring forth, bear" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

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parturient (adj.)

"about to give birth," literally or figuratively, 1590s, from Latin parturientem (nominative parturiens), present participle of parturire "be in labor," literally "desire to bring forth," desiderative of parire "to bring forth, bear, produce, create; bring about, accomplish" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, bring forth"). Related: Parturiency.

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-parous 

word-forming element meaning "bearing, producing," from Latin -parus (as in viviparus "bringing forth young alive"), from parire "to produce, bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

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profuse (adj.)

early 15c., "lavish, extravagant, liberal to excess," from Latin profusus "spread out, lavish, extravagant," literally "poured forth," past-participle adjective from profundere "pour forth," from pro "forth" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward") + fundere "to pour" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). Meaning "bountiful, abundant, copious" is from c. 1600. Related: Profusely; profuseness.

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germination (n.)

mid-15c., from Latin germinationem (nominative germinatio) "a sprouting forth, budding," noun of action from past-participle stem of germinare "to sprout, put forth shoots," from germen (genitive germinis) "a sprout or bud" (see germ).

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