Etymology
Advertisement
buffer (n.1)
"something that absorbs a blow, apparatus for deadening the concussion between a moving body and that against which it strikes," 1835, agent noun from obsolete verb buff "make a dull sound when struck" (mid-16c.), from Old French bufe "a blow, slap, punch" (see buffet (n.2)). Figurative sense of "anything that prevents impact or neutralizes the shock of impact of opposing forces" is from 1858.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
storage (n.)
1610s, "space for storing," from store (v.) + -age. Storage unit as a household piece attested from 1951.
Related entries & more 
buffer (n.2)
"one who or that which polishes by buffing," 1854, agent noun from buff (v.).
Related entries & more 
buffer (v.)

"lessen the impact of," 1886, from buffer (n.). Related: Buffered; buffering.

Related entries & more 
readout (n.)

also read-out, 1946 in the computer sense, "extraction or transfer of data from a storage device," from the verbal phrase; see read (v.) + out (adv.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
DOS 

"computer operating system using a disk storage device," 1967, acronym of disk operating system.

Related entries & more 
root-cellar (n.)

"cellar set aside for storage of roots and tubers," 1822, from root (n.) + cellar (n.).

Related entries & more 
safe-deposit (adj.)

"providing safe storage for valuables of any kind," by 1864; see safe (adj.) + deposit (n.).

Related entries & more 
box (v.1)
"to put into storage, place into a box," mid-15c., from box (n.1). Related: Boxed; boxing.
Related entries & more 
deep-freeze (n.)
registered trademark (U.S. Patent Office, 1941) of a type of refrigerator; used generically for "cold storage" since 1949.
Related entries & more