Etymology
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broker (n.)

mid-14c. (mid-13c. in surnames), "commercial agent, factor," also "an agent in sordid business," from Anglo-French brocour "small trader," from abrokur "retailer of wine, tapster;" perhaps from Portuguese alborcar "barter," but more likely from Old French brocheor, from brochier "to broach, tap, pierce (a keg)," from broche (Old North French broke, broque) "pointed tool" (see broach (n.)), with an original sense of "wine dealer," hence "retailer, middleman, agent." In Middle English, used contemptuously of peddlers and pimps, "one who buys and sells public office" (late 14c. in Anglo-French), "intermediary in love or marriage" (late 14c.).

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broker (v.)

"to act as a broker," 1630s (implied in brokering), from broker (n.). Related: Brokered.

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power-broker (n.)

"one who by intrigue exerts influence on the distribution of political power," 1961, apparently coined by (or at least popularized by) T.H. White in reference to the 1960 U.S. presidential election; from power (n.) + broker (n.).

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pawnbroker (n.)

"one licensed to lend money at interest on pledge or deposit of goods," 1680s, from pawn (n.1) + broker (n.).

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brokerage (n.)

mid-15c., "a broker's trade," from broker (n.) + -age. Also, in 17c., "a pimp's trade." From 1620s as "fee or commission charged for doing business as a broker."

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matchmaker (n.)

also match-maker, "marriage-broker," 1630s, from match (n.2) + maker. Especially "one who officiously or obtrusively promotes a match or matches." Related: Match-making.

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job (v.)

1660s, "to buy and sell as a broker" (intransitive), from job (n.). Meaning "deal in public stocks on one's own account" is from 1721. Meaning "to cheat, betray" is from 1903; earlier "pervert public service to private advantage" (1732). Related: Jobbed; jobbing.

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guttersnipe (n.)

also gutter-snipe, 1857, from gutter (n.) + snipe (n.); originally Wall Street slang for "streetcorner broker," attested later (1869) as "street urchin," also "one who gathers rags and paper from gutters." As a name for the common snipe, it dates from 1874 but is perhaps earlier.

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contango (n.)

1853, "charge made or percentage received by a broker or seller for deferring settlement of a stock sale," a stockbroker's invention, perhaps somehow derived from continue, or from Spanish contengo "I contain, refrain, restrain, check." Continuation was used in this sense from 1813. As a verb, from 1900.

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