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pointed (adj.)

c. 1300, "having a sharp end or ends," from point (n.). Meaning "having the quality of penetrating the feelings or mind" is from 1660s; that of "aimed at or expressly intended for some particular person" is by 1798. Related: Pointedly; pointedness.

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bristle (n.)
"stiff, coarse hair of certain animals," especially those set along the backs of hogs, Old English byrst "bristle," with metathesis of -r-, from Proto-Germanic *bursti- (source also of Middle Dutch borstel, German borste, Danish börste), from PIE *bhrsti- from root *bhars- "point, bristle" (source also of Sanskrit bhrstih "point, spike"). With -el, diminutive suffix. Extended to similar appendages on some plants and insects.
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bristle (v.)
c. 1200 (implied in past-participle adjective bristled) "set or covered with bristles," from bristle (n.). Of hair, "to stand or become stiff and upright," late 15c. Extended meaning "become angry or excited" is 1540s, from the way animals show fight. Related: Bristling.
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horripilation (n.)
1650s, from Late Latin horripilationem (nominative horripilatio), noun of action from past participle stem of horripilare "bristle with hairs, be shaggy," from stem of horrere "to bristle" (see horror) + pilus "hair" (see pile (n.3)). The verb horripilate is attested from 1620s.
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seta (n.)
plural setae, 1793, from Latin seta "bristle." Related: Setaceous.
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chaetophobia (n.)

"fear of hair," 1977, from chaeto- "hair; bristle" + -phobia "fear."

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bristly (adj.)
1590s, "thickly set with bristles," from bristle (n.) + -y (2). Figurative sense is recorded from 1872. Related: Bristliness.
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bur (n.)
"prickly seed vessel of some plants," c. 1300, burre, from a Scandinavian source (compare Danish borre, Swedish hard-borre, Old Norse burst "bristle"), from PIE *bhars- (see bristle (n.)). Transferred 1610s to "rough edge on metal," which might be the source of the sense "rough sound of the letter -r-" (see burr). Also the name given to various tools and appliances.
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hirsute (adj.)
"hairy," 1620s, from Latin hirsutus "rough, shaggy, bristly," figuratively "rude, unpolished," related to hirtus "shaggy," and possibly to horrere "to bristle with fear" (see horror).
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rapier (n.)

type of pointed sword, 1550s, from French rapière, from espee rapiere "long, pointed two-edged sword" (late 15c.), in which the adjective is of uncertain origin; perhaps it is from a derisive use of raspiere "poker, scraper." Dutch, Danish rapier, German Rappier are from French.

Originally a long, pointed, two-edged sword with a guard for the hand, used, especially in 16c.-17c., for either cutting or thrusting; later, in fencing, a light, sharp-pointed sword for thrusting.

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