Etymology
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No results were found for brewers'. Showing results for brewery.
brewery (n.)
1650s (but perhaps from c. 1200 as a surname element); see brew (v.) + -ery. Old English had breawern in this sense (from aern "house;" see barn), and brewhouse was the more common word through 18c.
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Guinness 
Irish brewery, founded 1759 by Arthur Guinness (1725-1803) in Dublin.
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brewhouse (n.)
also brew-house, "brewery, building in which beer is brewed," late 14c. (late 13c. as a surname), from brew (v.) + house (n.).
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hogwash (n.)
mid-15c., hogges wash, "kitchen slops fed to pigs, refuse of a kitchen or brewery," from hog (n.) + wash (n.). Extended to "cheap liquor" (1712) then to "inferior writing" (1773).
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brasserie (n.)

"beer saloon in which food is served," 1864, from French brasserie "beer-garden attached to a brewery," from brasser "to brew," from Latin brace "grain used to prepare malt," said by Pliny to be a Celtic word (compare Welsh brag "malt").

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refrigerator (n.)

1610s, "something that cools, that which keeps cool," agent noun from refrigerate. As "cabinet or chamber for keeping food or other contents cooled to a little above freezing," 1824, originally in the brewery trade, in place of earlier refrigeratory (c. 1600). Electric-powered household refrigerating and ice machines were widely available from c. 1918.

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