Etymology
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breech (n.)

"back part of a gun or firearm," 1570s, from singular of breeches (q.v.) in the sense "lower part of the body," hence "the hinder part of anything" (especially the part of a cannon or firearm behind the barrel). Breech-loader is from 1858.

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presentation (n.)

late 14c., presentacioun, "act of presenting, ceremonious giving of a gift, prize, etc.," from Old French presentacion (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin praesentationem (nominative praesentatio) "a placing before," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin praesentare "to present, show, exhibit," literally "to place before," from stem of praesens (see present (adj.)).

The meaning "that which is offered or presented" is from mid-15c.; that of "a theatrical or other representation" is recorded from c. 1600. Related: Presentational.

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breech (v.)

late 15c., "put in breeches," from breeches. Meaning "fit a gun with a breech" is from 1757, from breech (n.). Related: Breeched; breeching.

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re-presentation (n.)

"a presenting again, a renewed presentation," 1805, from re- "back, again" + presentation or else a noun formed to go with re-present. With hyphenated spelling and full pronunciation of the prefix to distinguish it from representation.

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britches (n.)

1905, variant of britch (1620s), an old variant of breech (see breeches).

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Sharps (n.)

type of breech-loading single-shot rifle, 1850, from J. Christian Sharps (1811-1874), U.S. gunsmith.

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dumb-show (n.)

1560s, "pantomime dramatic presentation," from dumb (adj.) + show (n.).

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nouvelle cuisine 

style of cooking emphasizing freshness and attractive presentation, 1975, French, literally "new cooking."

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advowson (n.)

"right of presentation to an ancient benefice," c. 1300, from Anglo-French advouison, Old French avoeson, from Latin advocationem (see advocation).

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viewing (n.)

1540s, "inspection," verbal noun from view (v.). From 1944 as "last presentation of a dead body before the funeral" (earlier viewing (of) the remains, 1920); from 1959 as "the watching of television."

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