Etymology
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respiration (n.)

late 14c., respiracioun, "act or process of breathing, inhalation and exhalation of air by the lungs," from Latin respirationem (nominative respiratio) "breathing, respiration," noun of action from past-participle stem of respirare "breathe again, breathe in and out," from re- "again" (see re-) + spirare "to breathe" (see spirit (n.)). Extended to plants by 1831. Milton used it for "act of returning to life" ("breathing again").

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panting (n.)

"gasping, a difficulty in breathing," mid-15c., noun of action from pant (v.).

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choke-hold (n.)

"tight grip around a person's neck to restrict breathing," 1962, from choke (v.) + hold (n.1).

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pant (n.)

"a gasping breath, a quick, short effort of breathing," c. 1500, from pant (v.).

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apnea (n.)

in pathology, "suspension of breathing," originally, and until recently most commonly, apnoea, 1719, Modern Latin, from Greek apnoia "absence of respiration," from apnoos "without breathing, without wind," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + pnein "to breathe" (see pneuma).

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spiracle (n.)

"air hole," 1610s, from Latin spiraculum "breathing hole," from spirare "to breathe" (see spirit (n.)). Related: Spiracular.

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aspiration (n.1)

late 14c., aspiracioun, "a spirant;" 1530s as "action of breathing into," from Latin aspirationem (nominative aspiratio) "a breathing on, a blowing upon; rough breathing; influence," noun of action from past-participle stem of aspirare "strive for, seek to reach," literally "breathe at, blow upon" (see aspire). The meaning "steadfast longing for a higher goal, earnest desire for something above one" is recorded from c. 1600 (sometimes collectively, as aspirations).

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afflatus (n.)

"miraculous communication of supernatural knowledge or power," 1660s, from Latin afflatus "a breathing upon, blast," figuratively "inspiration," noun use of past participle of afflare "to blow upon," from ad "to" (see ad-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow"). The literal meaning "a blowing or breathing upon" is rare in English, this sense being taken by afflation.

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tachypnea (n.)

"hysterical rapid breathing," 1896, from tachy- "swift" + -pnea, from pnein "to breathe" (see pneuma). Related: Tachypneic.

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death-rattle (n.)

"sound sometimes heard in the last labored breathing of a dying person," 1805, from death + rattle (n.).

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