Etymology
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breakup (n.)

also break-up, "a disruption, dissolution of connection, separation of a mass into parts," 1795, from verbal expression break up "separate, dissolve" (mid-15c.); see break (v.) + up (adv.). The verbal phrase was used of plowland, later of groups, assemblies, etc.; of things (also of marriages, relationships), from mid-18c. Break it up as a command to stop a fight, etc., is recorded from 1936.

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Czechoslovakia (n.)

Central European nation from 1919-1992, from Czecho-, Latinized combining form of Czech + Slovakia (see Slovak). Related: Czechoslovak; Czechoslovakian. Since the breakup the western part has been known in English as the Czech Republic or Czechia.

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Colombia 

South American nation, independent from 1819 as part of Gran Colombia (after its breakup in 1830, known as New Granada, then Colombia from 1863); named for Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (Italian Colombo, Portuguese Colom, Spanish Colón). Related: Colombian.

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