Etymology
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ground-breaking (adj.)

also groundbreaking, 1907 as a figurative adjective, from expression to break ground (1650s), either for planting or for building, which was in figurative use by 1884; see ground (n.) + break (v.).

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back-breaking (adj.)

"physically demanding" (of manual labor), 1849; see back (n.) + break (v.).

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breakage (n.)

1767, "loss or damage done by breaking;" 1813, "action of breaking;" from break (v.) + -age.

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abruption (n.)
Origin and meaning of abruption

c. 1600, "a sudden breaking off," from Latin abruptionem (nominative abruptio) "a breaking off," noun of action from past-participle stem of abrumpere "break off," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + rumpere "to break," from a nasalized form of the PIE root *runp- "to break" (see corrupt (adj.)).

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fragmentation (n.)

"a breaking up into parts," 1842, noun of action from fragment (v.). Fragmentation grenade attested from 1918.

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rupture (n.)

late 14c., in medicine, "act of bursting or breaking," in reference to a vessel, etc. of the body, from Old French rupture and directly from Latin ruptura "the breaking (of a vein), fracture (of an arm or leg)," from past-participle stem of rumpere "to break" (from PIE root *runp- "to break;" see corrupt (adj.)).

Specifically as "abdominal hernia" from early 15c. The sense of "breach of friendly relations or concord" is by 1580s; the general sense of "act or fact of breaking or bursting" is by 1640s. Rupturewort (1590s) was held to be efficacious in treating hernias, etc.

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ice-pick (n.)

"small hand-tool, shaped like an awl, used for breaking ice," 1858, from ice (n.) + pick (n.1).

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pick (n.1)

c. 1200, "pointed iron tool for breaking up rock or ground," apparently a variant of pike (n.4).

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interruption (n.)

late 14c., "a break of continuity," from Latin interruptionem (nominative interruptio) "a breaking off, interruption, interval," noun of action from past participle stem of interrumpere "to break apart, break off" (see interrupt (v.)). Meaning "a breaking in upon some action" is from c. 1400; that of "a pause, a temporary cessation" is early 15c.

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fraction (n.)

late 14c., originally in the mathematical sense, from Anglo-French fraccioun (Old French fraccion, "a breaking," 12c., Modern French fraction) and directly from Late Latin fractionem (nominative fractio) "a breaking," especially into pieces, in Medieval Latin "a fragment, portion," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin frangere "to break (something) in pieces, shatter, fracture," from Proto-Italic *frang-, from a nasalized variant of PIE root *bhreg- "to break." Meaning "a breaking or dividing" in English is from early 15c.; sense of "broken off piece, fragment," is from c. 1600.

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