Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for branchlet. Showing results for bracelet.
bracelet (n.)
"ornamental ring or clasped chain for the wrist," mid-15c., from Old French bracelet (14c.), diminutive of bracel, from Latin bracchiale "armlet," from bracchium "an arm, a forearm," from Greek brakhion "an arm" (see brachio-).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
anklet (n.)
"ornamental ring for an ankle," 1810, from ankle, with diminutive suffix -let, after bracelet, etc.
Related entries & more 
armlet (n.)
1530s, "metal band or ring worn around the upper arm," diminutive of arm (n.1) with -let. Compare bracelet. The Latin word was armilla. As "a small intrusion of the sea into the land," also 1530s.
Related entries & more 
*mregh-u- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "short."

It forms all or part of: abbreviate; abbreviation; abridge; amphibrach; brace; bracelet; brachio-; brachiopod; brachiosaurus; brachy-; brassiere; breviary; brevity; brief; brumal; brume; embrace; merry; mirth; pretzel; vambrace.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek brakhys "short;" Latin brevis "short, low, little, shallow;" Old Church Slavonic bruzeja "shallow places, shoals;" Gothic gamaurgjan "to shorten."
Related entries & more 
armilla (n.)
1706, "bracelet," from Latin armilla "bracelet, armlet, arm ring," from armus "shoulder, upper arm" (from PIE root *ar- "to fit together"). Related: Armillary.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bangle (n.)
"ornamental ring worn upon the arm or ankle," 1787, from Hindi bangri "colored glass bracelet or anklet."
Related entries & more 
manilla (2)

also manilio, "metal (usually copper) ring or arm-bracelet sold or bartered by European traders among African peoples," 1550s, from Spanish manilla, from Latin monilia, plural of monile "collar, necklace," from PIE *mon- "neck, nape of the neck" (source also of mane). Influenced in Spanish by Spanish mano "hand."

Related entries & more 
bagel (n.)

"ring-shaped hard bread roll," 1912 (beigel), from Yiddish beygl, from Middle High German boug- "ring, bracelet," from Old High German boug "a ring," related to Old English beag "ring" (in poetry, an Anglo-Saxon lord was beaggifa "ring-giver"), from Proto-Germanic *baugaz, from PIE root *bheug- "to bend," with derivatives referring to curved objects.

Related entries & more 
ferrule (n.)

"metal cap on a rod," 1610s, ferule, earlier verrel (early 15c.), from Old French virelle "ferrule, collar" (12c. Modern French virole), from Medieval Latin viriola "bracelet," diminutive of Latin viriae "bracelets," from a Gaulish word akin to Old Irish fiar "bent, crooked," from PIE *wi-ria-, from root *wei- "to turn, twist, bend." Spelling influenced by Latin ferrum "iron."

Related entries & more 
*bhendh- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to bind."

It forms all or part of: band; bandanna; bend; bind; bindle; bond; bund; bundle; cummerbund; ribbon; woodbine.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit badhnati "binds," bandhah "a tying, bandage;" Old Persian bandaka- "subject;" Lithuanian bendras "partner;" Middle Irish bainna "bracelet;" Old English bendan "to bend a bow, confine with a string," bindan "to bind," Gothic bandi "that which binds."
Related entries & more