Etymology
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branch (n.)

c. 1300, braunch, "division or subdivision of the stem of a tree or bush" (also used of things resembling a branch in its relation to a trunk, such as geographic features, lines of family descent), from Old French branche "branch, bough, twig; branch of a family" (12c.), from Late Latin branca "footprint," later "a claw, paw," which is of unknown origin, said to be probably from Gaulish. The connecting notion would be the shape (compare pedigree).

In English it replaced native bough. The meaning "local office of a business" is recorded by 1817, from the earlier sense of "component part of a system" (1690s).

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branch (v.)

"send out shoots or new limbs," late 14c., also, of blood vessels, family trees, etc., "be forked," from branch (n.). The meaning "spread out from a center, radiate" is from c. 1400. Related: Branched; branching.

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ramada (n.)

"arbor, porch," 1869, in the U.S. West, from American Spanish ramada "tent, shelter," from Spanish ramada "an arbor," from rama "branch," from Vulgar Latin *rama, collective of Latin ramus "branch" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root").

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ramify (v.)

early 15c., ramifien, "to branch out, form branches," from Old French ramifier (early 14c.), from Medieval Latin ramificari, ramificare "to form branches," from Latin ramus "branch" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root") + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Ramified; ramifying.

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ramus (n.)

in anatomy, "a branch or branching part," 1803, from Latin ramus "a branch, bough, twig," from earlier *radmo- and cognate with radix "root," from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root." This is the old reconstruction, which de Vaan, after some hesitation, finds justified. Related: Ramulous; ramulose.

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microelectronics (n.)

"branch of technology concerned with microcircuits," by 1958, from micro- + electronics.

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radicle (n.)

1670s, in botany, "rootlet, part of the embryo of a plant which develops into the primary root," from Latin radicula, diminutive of radix "root" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root"). Anatomical sense of "branch of a nerve, vein, etc. resembling a root" is by 1830.

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neonatology (n.)

branch of medicine concerned with newborn infants, 1960, from neonate "recently born infant" + -ology.

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hedonics (n.)

"branch of ethics which treats of the doctrines of pleasure," 1865, from hedonic; also see -ics.

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Seabee (n.)

1942, from pronunciation of C.B., abbreviation of Construction Battalion, formed as a volunteer branch of the Civil Engineer Corps of the U.S. Navy.

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