Etymology
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childbirth (n.)

also child-birth, "act of bringing forth a child, labor," mid-15c., from child + birth (n.).

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method (n.)

early 15c., "regular, systematic treatment of disease," from Latin methodus "way of teaching or going," from Greek methodos "scientific inquiry, method of inquiry, investigation," originally "pursuit, a following after," from meta "in pursuit or quest of" (see meta-) + hodos "a method, system; a way or manner" (of doing, saying, etc.), also "a traveling, journey," literally "a path, track, road," a word of uncertain origin (see Exodus).

Meaning "any way of doing anything, orderly regulation of conduct with a view to the attainment of an end" is from 1580s; that of "orderliness, regularity" is from 1610s. Meaning "a system or complete sent of rules for attaining an end" is from 1680s. In reference to a theory of acting associated with Russian director Konstantin Stanislavski (1863-1938), it is attested from 1923.

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Bradley 

masc. proper name, originally a surname, from various places in England, literally "the broad clearing," from Old English elements brad (see broad (adj.)) + leah (see lea). Most popular in U.S. c. 1965-1995.

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Lamaze (adj.)

in reference to a method of childbirth technique, 1957, named for French obstetrician Dr. Fernand Lamaze (1891-1957), who promoted his methods of "psycho-prophylaxis," a form of childbirth preparation he had studied in the Soviet Union, in the West in the early 1950s.

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lochia (n.)

"discharge from the uterus after childbirth," 1680s, Modern Latin, from Greek lokhia "childbirth," neuter plural of lokhios "pertaining to childbirth," from lokhos "a lying in, childbirth," also, "an ambush," from PIE root *legh- "to lie down, lay." Related: Lochial. Greek Lokhia also was an epithet or surname of Artemis in her aspect as protectress of women in childbirth; in this case it is the fem. of the adjective lokhios.

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BVDs (n.)

"men's underwear," 1935, from trademark name (dating to 1876) of manufacturer Bradley, Voorhees, and Day.

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methodize (v.)

1580s, "to make methodical, reduce to method," from method + -ize. Intransitive sense of "to be methodical, use method" is by 1771. Related: Methodized; methodizer; methodizing. Methodization "act or process of making methodical" is by 1808.

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colostrum (n.)

"the first milk secreted in the breasts after childbirth," 1570s, from Latin colostrum "first milk from an animal," earlier colustra, a word of unknown etymology.

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puerperium (n.)

"confinement during and after childbirth," 1863, from Latin puerperus (see puerperal). From c. 1600 in navitized form puerpery.

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obstetrics (n.)

"science of midwifery, the department of medicine which deals with the treatment and care of women during pregnancy and childbirth," 1819, from obstetric (adj.); also see -ics.

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