Etymology
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boundary (n.)

"that which indicates the limits of anything," 1620s, from bound (n.1) + -ary. Strictly, a visible mark indicating a dividing line, a bound being the limit or furthest point of extension of any one thing.

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bound (n.1)

c. 1300, "boundary marker," from Anglo-Latin bunda, from Old French bonde "limit, boundary, boundary stone" (12c., Modern French borne), a variant of bodne, from Medieval Latin bodina, which is perhaps from Gaulish.

It is attested from mid-14c. as "an external limit, that which limits or circumscribes;" figuratively, of feelings, etc., from late 14c. From late 14c. as "limits of an estate or territory." Now chiefly in the phrase out of bounds, which originally referred to limits imposed on students at schools (by 1751); the other senses generally have gone with boundary.

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interminate (adj.)

1530s, from Latin interminatus "unbounded, endless," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + terminalis "pertaining to a boundary or end, final," from terminus "end, boundary line" (see terminus).

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Marley 

surname, from place-names in England, probably "boundary wood or clearing," from Old English mære "boundary, border, landmark" (see merestone) + leah (see lea).

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limit (n.)

c. 1400, "boundary, frontier," from Old French limite "a boundary," from Latin limitem (nominative limes) "a boundary, limit, border, embankment between fields," which is probably related to limen "threshold," and possibly from the base of limus "transverse, oblique," which is of uncertain origin. Originally of territory; general sense from early 15c. Colloquial sense of "the very extreme, the greatest degree imaginable" is from 1904.

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mete (n.)

by c. 1400, "a goal" (a sense now obsolete); late 15c. (Caxton) "a boundary, limit, boundary mark," from Old French mete "limit, bounds, frontier" and directly from Latin mēta "goal, boundary, post, pillar," which is of uncertain origin. Surviving only in plural, in the phrase metes and bounds (Anglo-Latin metis et bundis, early 14c.)

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conterminous (adj.)

"having the same limit, touching at the boundary," 1670s, from Latin conterminus "bordering upon, having a common boundary," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + terminus "end, boundary line" (see terminus). Related: Conterminously; conterminousness.

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bound (v.1)

late 14c., "to form the boundary of," also "to set the boundaries of, confine within limits;" late 15c., "to be a boundary of, abut, adjoin," from bound (n.1). Related: Bounded; bounding.

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Mersey 

English river running past Liverpool, c. 1000, Mærse, probably "boundary river," from Old English mæres (genitive singular of mære "boundary, object indicating a boundary;" see mere (n.2)) + ea "river." Related: Merseysider. Mersey beat, in reference to the popular music style associated with the Beatles, is by 1963.

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mere (n.2)

"boundary line" (between kingdoms, estates, fields, etc.), now surviving in provincial use or place names, but once an important word, from Old English mære "boundary, object indicating a boundary," from Proto-Germanic *mairjo- (source also of Middle Dutch mere "boundary mark, stake," Old Norse -mæri "boundary, border-land"), related to Latin murus "wall" (see mural (n.)).

Hence merestone "stone serving as a landmark" (Old English mærstan); mere-stake "pole or tree standing as a mark or boundary" (1620s); meresman "man appointed to find boundaries" (of a parish, etc.). In Middle English meres of erthe (c. 1400) was "the ends of the earth."

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