Etymology
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fluid (adj.)

early 15c., "liquid, capable of flowing," from Old French fluide (14c.) and directly from Latin fluidus "fluid, flowing, moist," from fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Figurative use, of non-material things, "not fixed or rigid," from 1640s. Related: Fluidly.

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fluid (n.)
"substance capable of flowing," 1660s, from fluid (adj.). Related: Fluidal (1869), fluidic (1821, Marmaduke Tulket).
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bodily (adj.)
c. 1300, "pertaining to the body;" also opposed to "spiritual;" from body + -ly (1). As an adverb (with -ly (2)) from late 14c.
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interception (n.)
early 15c., "action of intercepting" (the flow of a bodily fluid), from Latin interceptionem (nominative interceptio) "a seizing, taking away," noun of action from past participle stem of intercipere (see intercept (v.)). Specific football/rugby sense is attested by 1897. Meaning "action of closing in on and destroying an enemy aircraft, etc." is recorded from 1939.
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chyme (n.)

early 15c., "bodily fluid;" c. 1600 in specific sense of "mass of semi-liquid food in the stomach," from Late Latin chymus, from Greek khymos, nearly identical to khylos "juice" (see chyle) and meaning essentially the same thing; from PIE root *gheu- "to pour." Differentiated by Galen, who used khymos for "juice in its natural or raw state," and khylos for "juice produced by digestion," hence the modern distinction.

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fluidity (n.)
c. 1600, from French fluidité, from fluide (see fluid (adj.)), or else formed in English from fluid.
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slurry (n.)
mid-15c., "mud, slime, semi-fluid mix of water and dirt or clay," probably related to Middle English sloor "thin or fluid mud" (see slur (n.)).
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coolant (n.)

"radiator fluid," 1915, from cool (adj.) + -ant.

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seepage (n.)

"percolation, oozing fluid or moisture," 1825, from seep + -age.

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biorhythm (n.)
also bio-rhythm, "cyclic variation in some bodily function," 1960, from bio- + rhythm. Related: Biorhythmic.
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